Vale Peter Corrigan AM – ‘maverick’ architect prepared to take risks

cities-of-hope-1163

Architectural model, Peter Corrigan: Cities of Hope, RMIT Gallery 2013. Installation image by Mark Ashkanasy

Vale Peter Corrigan AM – RMIT Architecture Professor and RAIA Gold Medal winning architect, well known for designing RMIT’s Building 8 – a campus landmark and city icon.

RMIT Gallery’s Cities of Hope exhibition in 2013 paid tribute to Corrigan’s creative achievements across architecture and set design, and explored his status as a ‘maverick designer’ prepared to take risks.

RMIT Gallery Director Suzanne Davies said her intrigue and respect for Peter Corrigan’s creative output and teaching made the idea of an exhibition immediately compelling both in the achievements of the architectural firm Corrigan and Edmond along with Corrigan’s work in theatre.

“Throughout, it is the voice and vision of Peter Corrigan, nudging, guiding, shaping, challenging, provoking, transforming, enabling and seducing, that we hear and see in all their contrarian passion.”

cities-of-hope-2038

Installation image, Peter Corrigan: Cities of Hope, RMIT Gallery, 2013. Image by Mark Ashkanasy.

Corrigan, who has passed away on 1 December 2016,  was a professor of architecture at RMIT since 1975. In 2013, the Institute awarded him the Neville Quarry Architectural Education Prize. Read more.

“I first became aware of Peter Corrigan’s energy and influence as a teacher at the time RMIT became publisher of the architectural journal Transition and then through his theatre work having been engaged to photograph a set and costumes,” Ms Davies said.

cities-of-hope-208_1

Peter Corrigan set design, Cities of Hope, RMIT Gallery 2013, photo by Mark Ashkanasy

Peter Corrigan: Cities of Hope traced the creative focus of the remarkable Australian architect, bringing to life many of his designs over four decades including architectural models and drawings by Edmond and Corrigan; set and costume designs for theatre; artworks, records and notations from his personal collection and key works selected from public collections which have enriched his practice.

“Peter Corrigan always made it clear to RMIT Gallery the need to be mindful of historical context. He attended thoughtfully to most if not all our exhibitions.”

Artists discuss ‘diseases of the arts’ at RMIT Gallery

RMIT Gallery 2016 Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts Date: 17 NOV 2016 - 18 FEB 2017 Location: RMIT Gallery, City campus Morbis Artis explores the radical conjunction between the biomolecular and the artistic, and the thin doorway between life and death housed within discourses of disease.

Photo by Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery 2016

Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts at RMIT Gallery (17 November – 18 February 2016) is an interactive bio-art exhibition that uses actual and metaphoric communicative diseases to explore the fractured relationship between human and non-human life.

Join us at RMIT Gallery on Thursday 1 December from 5.30 – 6.30 pm as Cameron Bishop, Chris Henschke, Harry Nankin, Darrin Verhagen and Anne Scott Wilson discuss translating metaphor into art and their work in Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts. 

RMIT Gallery 2016 Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts Date: 17 NOV 2016 - 18 FEB 2017 Location: RMIT Gallery, City campus Morbis Artis explores the radical conjunction between the biomolecular and the artistic, and the thin doorway between life and death housed within discourses of disease.

The Zero Machine (or The Human Stain Remover), Cameron Bishop & Simon Reis. 
 Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts, RMIT Gallery installation image by Mark Ashkanasy, 2016.

Cameron Bishop’s mechanical installation seeks to rid the art world of all diseased art. This playful machine aesthetic re-mediates art ‘masterpieces’ as they are pressed and turned through the machine, coming out cleaned of all impressionable colour, line and shape. The blank surface we are left with is the ultimate neo-liberal art piece – instantly copyable and immediately forgettable.

RMIT Gallery 2016 Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts Date: 17 NOV 2016 - 18 FEB 2017 Location: RMIT Gallery, City campus Morbis Artis explores the radical conjunction between the biomolecular and the artistic, and the thin doorway between life and death housed within discourses of disease.

Song of the Phenomena, 2016, by Chris Henschke. Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts. RMIT Gallery installation image by Mark Ashkanasy, 2016.

Chris Henschke’s work explores anti-matter as we bare witness to how radiation is released by organic matter. Using an actual particle accelerator, the work shows how the humble bananaemits antimatter on a regular basis. In an age where we fear the way antimatter impacts upon the nature of everyday life and the workings of the cosmos, we see how the organic itself brings potential dissolution to the human world.

RMIT Gallery 2016 Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts Date: 17 NOV 2016 - 18 FEB 2017 Location: RMIT Gallery, City campus Morbis Artis explores the radical conjunction between the biomolecular and the artistic, and the thin doorway between life and death housed within discourses of disease.

Syzygy (2007-16) by Harry Nankin
Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts, RMIT Gallery installation image by Mark Ashkanasy, 2016

In Harry Nankin’s nine, multi-panel palimpsests displayed on light boxes, lake becomes semi-arid land as the impact of the contemporary ecological crisis finds its root and branch in starlight and shadowgram as live invertebrates mourn the age of the anthropocene. The work ‘photo-poetically’ memorializes this erasure, resurrecting the dry lakebed into a focal plane upon which primal starlight is used to imprint photographic films on moonless nights. The environmental disease at the heart of this work is human-made: as we lay waste to our planet, the stars are slowly going out.

RMIT Gallery 2016 Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts Date: 17 NOV 2016 - 18 FEB 2017 Location: RMIT Gallery, City campus Morbis Artis explores the radical conjunction between the biomolecular and the artistic, and the thin doorway between life and death housed within discourses of disease.

blue/red:VIM/SIMS (2016) 
Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts, RMIT Gallery installation image by Mark Ashkanasy 2016

In Darrin Verhagen’s work with the group (((20hz))) sound-image installation explores the way audio-visual fields can wildly affect the well-being of the hearing-viewer. With two catastrophic audio-vision soundtracks that register as sickly encounters, one can choose to hear without commentary, or to hear about how and why the soundscape induces nausea. Pulsating light beams and reflections accompany these sound pieces like a cosmos is dying and exploding before us.

RMIT Gallery 2016 Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts Date: 17 NOV 2016 - 18 FEB 2017 Location: RMIT Gallery, City campus Morbis Artis explores the radical conjunction between the biomolecular and the artistic, and the thin doorway between life and death housed within discourses of disease.

Fluid retention, 2016 
Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts, RMIT Gallery installation image by Mark Ashkanasy, 2016

Anne Scott Wilson’s balloon installation and video projection explores the poetics of gravity and the chrononormativity of time to account and prepare us for the not-living that eventually befalls us all. The stillness of the balloon and the movement of the ballet dancer speak to the material divide between the body that lives, that dies, and that then, perhaps, floats away.

What: Panel discussion artist talk with Cameron Bishop, Chris Henschke, Harry Nankin, Darrin Verhagen and Anne Scott Wilson

When: Thursday 1 December 5.30-6.30 pm

Where: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street Melbourne

Bookings: free – please register 

 

Hybrid worlds: Ursula Hoff Contemporary Lecture on Tuesday 22 November 5.30-6.30 pm

img_5099

Drew Berry will speak at the 2016 Ursula Hoff Contemporary lecture. He is exhibiting his biomedical animations in Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts at RMIT Gallery (17 November 2016 -18 February 2017)

As part of the RMIT Gallery exhibition Morbid Artis: Diseases of the Arts, RMIT Gallery, the Ursula Hoff Institute and the S.R Stoneman Foundation are pleased to present

2016 URSULA HOFF CONTEMPORARY LECTURE:

Hybrid Worlds: When Art and Science Collide –

Tuesday 22 November 5.30-6.30 pm

followed by exhibition viewing and Xmas drinks and refreshments.

Addressing the challenges of identity, culture and interspecies relationships in today’s ‘super connected’ global society.

Free: bookings here

Speakers

Dr Drew Berry Biomedical animator at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research.

Dr Jonathan Duckworth Director of the Creative Interventions Art & Rehabilitative Technology lab (CiART).  Vice Chancellor’s Research Fellow in the School of Media and Communication at RMIT University.

Prof Angela Ndalianis Professor in Screen Studies at Melbourne University.

Prof Kim Vincs Director of the Deakin Motion.Lab, Deakin University’s motion capture studio and performance technology research centre.

hofflecture2016_final_800pxAbout the speakers

Dr Drew Berry, biomedical animator at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research. You might know Drew’s work fromthe music videos he’s made for Bjork. Drew’s work features in the RMIT Gallery exhibition Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts(17 November  2016 – 18 February 2017).

Dr Jonathan Duckworth, Director of the Creative Interventions Art. and Rehabilitative Technology lab (CiART).  Vice Chancellor’s Research Fellow in the School of Media and Communication at RMIT University and recipient of the 2016 RMIT Award for Research Impact – Early Career Researcher (Design). Jonathan works at the junction of art and science, using his background as an architect to design virtual environments for patients. He has designed two highly successful projects called Elements and Resonance funded by the Australia Research Council and Australia Council for the Arts. Both works provide a medium for rehabilitation of movement and cognition for individuals with an acquired brain injury. Elements was recognised for its design innovation as a recipient of the 2015 Victorian Premier’s Design Award and 2016 Good Design Award.

Professor Angela Ndalianis is Professor in Screen Studies and Director of the Transformative Technologies Research Unit at the University of Melbourne. Her publications include The Horror Sensorium: Media and the SensesNeo-baroque Aesthetics and Contemporary EntertainmentScience Fiction Experiences and the edited collection The Contemporary Comic Book Superhero. Her current research explores the important role played by entertainment media in the advancement of robotics.

Professor Kim Vincs is the Director of the Deakin Motion.Lab, Deakin University’s motion capture studio and performance technology research centre. Her research brings together scientific, technological and artistic methodologies to develop new ways of creating dance performance.

img_5045

Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts at RMIT Gallery (17 November 2016 – 18 February 2017)

Interactive bioart at RMIT Gallery – Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts

morbisartisevitebookingurls-1200px

Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts – invitation

Please join us for the opening of Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts on Wednesday 16 November 6-8 pm at RMIT Gallery.

Vicki Sowry, Director of the Australian Network for Art and Technology (ANAT) will open the exhibition. ANAT is Australia’s leading cultural organisation working at the intersection of art, science & technology; networked & emergent art practices; experimental music & sound arts; and mobile & portable platforms.

Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts is an interactive bio-art exhibition uses actual and metaphoric communicative diseases to explore the fractured relationship between human and non-human life.

Works by 18 artists explore the thin doorway that exists between life and death in what is the vexing age of species and habitus destruction, and the increasingly permeable tissues of contemporary bodies.

img_4832

Lienors Torre’s multi-media and glass work on degenerative vision explores how our view of the world is metered and tainted by digital technologies.

The art work is also set within current debates and concerns about what constitutes life, what counts as a sentient being, and who gets to determine what lives are saved, punished, exploited and destroyed?

What is life?

What is disease?

These are the diseases of the arts…

RMIT Gallery’s artist talks further explore the fine line between art and science, and other binaries. Please join us for the following free public programs

Book now  Friday 18 November 1-2 pm artist talk + Drew Berry, biomedical animator

Book now  Tuesday 22 November 5.30-6.30 pm Ursula Hoff Contemporary Lecture: Hybrid Worlds: When Art and Science Collide. Speakers: Dr Drew Berry, Dr Jonathan Duckworth, Prof Angela Ndalianis, Prof Kim Vincs    

Book now Tuesday 29 November 1-2 pm artist talk + Lienors Torre & Anne Scott Wilson 

Book now Thursday 1 December 5.30-6.30 pm panel discussion + Cameron BishopChris HenschkeHarry NankinDarrin Verhagen Anne Scott Wilson

Book now Tuesday 6 December 1-2 pm artist talk + Alison Bennett & Jodi Sita 

Book now Thursday 8 December 5.30-6.30 pm panel discussion +  Alison Bennett, Drew Berry, Sean Redmond, Josh Redmond & Lienors Torre 

Book now Tuesday 13 December 12.30-1.30 pm artist talk + Chris Henschke & Harry Nankin

Last days of three RMIT Gallery exhibitions

vjp-18

Composer Liza Lim and ELISION Creative Director Daryl Buckley in the exhibition ELISION: 30 Years at RMIT Gallery. Photo by Vicki Jones.

Elision: 30 years

Australia’s international and enduring contemporary classical music ensemble Elision, is 30 years old this year and celebrating with an exhibition at RMIT Gallery.  Elision: 30 years explores the group’s musical journey from Melbourne church halls to the Paris Opera House, Kings Place London, and the Fomenko Theatre Moscow.

Through films, recordings, press, posters, sketches and drawings, this exhibition celebrates thirty years of contemporary practice and ELISION’s involvement with artists such as theatre directors Barrie Kosky, Michael Kantor, writers Allison Croggon, Beth Yahp, visual and new media artists Justine Cooper, Heri Dono, Judy Watson, Per Inge Bjørlo, Araya Rasdjarmrearnsook, Ensembles Modern and CIKADA, and composers Liza Lim, Brian Ferneyhough, Richard Barrett, Aldo Clementi, Franco Donatoni, John Rodgers, Aaron Cassidy, Dmitri Kourliandski, Turgut Ercetin, Timothy McCormack, Matthew Sergeant, and Luke Paulding amongst others.

img_4041_photo_tobias_titz__lowres_

Radical Actions: Seamus Nolan’s 10th President. Installation image at RMIT Gallery by Tobias Titz, 2016.

Radical Actions

Commemorating the 1916 Easter Rising in Ireland, which marked a pivotal moment in the Irish struggle for independence, the contemporary Irish exhibition Radical Actions, curated by Linda Shevlin, explores the after effects of Irish independence and self-governance and features new and existing work by high profile Irish artists Kennedy Browne (Gareth Kennedy & Sarah Browne), Duncan Campbell, Jesse Jones and Seamus Nolan.

Nolan is one of Ireland’s top young artists and his powerful work The 10th President, a political campaign to commemorate victims of institutional abuse, has a new recording using an Australian voice which highlights the global nature of institutional abuse.

img_3761_photo_tobias_titz__lowres_

Bijoy Jain Studio Mumbai: Making MPavilion 2016 features sketches, inspirations, drawings by the architect as well as large portraits by Australian photographer Nicholas Watt.

Bijoy Jain Studio Mumbai: Making MPavilion 2016

This exhibition presents the creative process in the design of this year’s MPavilion and explores the inspirations and processes of making and designing MPavilion 2016.

In addition to samples of materials and modelling sourced from Studio Mumbai, the exhibition includes photography from Australian photographer Nicholas Watt, providing a rare insight into the renowned architect’s process—one that has taken place both in Mumbai and Melbourne with local and international collaboration.

Presented in partnership with RMIT Gallery, Naomi Milgrom Foundation, Confluence: Festival of India and celebrates the forthcoming arrival of MPavilion 2016 to the Queen Victoria Gardens, Melbourne.

What: Elision: 30 years, Radical Actions, Bijoy Jain Studio Mumbai: Making MPavilion 2016

When: Exhibitions close 5 pm Saturday 22 October 2016

Where: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street, Melbourne.

Radical films: John Hughes film screening & talk at RMIT Gallery

On Thursday 20 October from 5.30-7.30 pm, RMIT Gallery screens Indonesia Calling: Joris Ivens In Australia. The documentary film, directed by John Hughes, recalls the birth of Indonesia, and the impact of a small film and its legacy for Australian documentary film culture.

Adjunct Prof John Hughes will introduce his film, and answer questions after the screening.

Ivens’ film was an activist documentary that depicted the crucial role of Australian trade union support in the establishment of the new Republic of Indonesia. All those who worked on it became ‘adversely known’ to the security services.

Indonesia Calling: Joris Ivens In Australia revisits the making of Ivens’ radical film, Australia’s early relationship with Indonesia and the impact of Ivens’ film.

Hughes has been recognised with a Lifetime Membership at the Australian Directors Guild (ADG) awards, and has been nominated for many awards for his films including the Australian Film Institute (AFI) awards and the Australian Writers’ Guild AWGIE awards.

An independent producer, writer and director for film, television and online media, Hughes’ work has engaged with Australian cultural and political history and issues over a number of decades. Among his credits are After Mabo, TrapsMoving HistoryThe Art Of WarOne Way Street and the cinema feature What I Have Written.

Hughes’ films have been screened at major national and international festivals, and broadcast by such networks as the ABC and SBS. He has a PhD by practice from RMIT’s School of Media and Communication and had a fellowship from the AFI Research Collection (a specialist film library housed at RMIT).

Indonesia Calling: Joris Ivens In Australia is part of the RMIT Gallery’s public programs for the current exhibition Radical Actions (until 22 October) that showcases work by contemporary Irish artists to commemorate the 1916 Easter Rising in Ireland.

Together with RMIT’s research centre for Communication, Politics and Culture, RMIT Gallery’s complementary ‘Images of Revolution’ film program presents films that reflect a deep commitment to social change and progressive politics.

What: Film screening: Indonesia Calling: Joris Ivens in Australia

When: Thursday 20 October from 5.30-7.30 pm

Where: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street, Melbourne

Bookings: Free. Register here

Strikebound revisited: Richard Lowenstein talk & film screening at RMIT Gallery

strikebound

On Thursday 13 October 5.30-7 pm RMIT Gallery screens the Director’s Cut of the digitally remastered version of Strikebound, the 1984 film that reconstructs the true story of a coal miners’ strike in the small Victorian town of Korumburra in the mid-30’s.

Celebrated Australian film and music video director Richard Lowenstein will give a short talk and answer questions after the screening.

Lowenstein has written and directed the feature films including Autoluminescent: Rowland S. Howard, Dogs in Space, He Died with a Felafel in His Hand, and Strikebound, as well as numerous award-winning music-videos, concert films and commercials.

Lowenstein wrote the ‘docudrama’ Strikebound about the Gippsland coal workers’ strike of 1937, adapting the screenplay from the book by author Wendy Lowenstein, a pioneer in oral history, notable for her recording of people’s everyday experiences and her advocacy of social activism.

Strikebound, featuring Chris Haywood, Hugh Keays-Byrne, and Carol Burns is based on the real-life story of two remarkable characters, Wattie Doig, a miner who became a militant Communist activist, and his wife, Agnes, who progressed from staunch Presbyterianism to membership in the Salvation Army and, finally, to labor organization.

Strikebound is part of the RMIT Gallery’s public programs for the current exhibition Radical Actions (until 22 October) that showcases work by contemporary Irish artists to commemorate the 1916 Easter Rising in Ireland.

Together with RMIT’s research centre for Communication, Politics and Culture, RMIT Gallery’s complementary ‘Images of Revolution’ film program presents films that reflect a deep commitment to social change and progressive politics.

Film critic Richard Kuipers calls Strikebound ‘a rare example of Australian political filmmaking’. Kupiers writes: ‘Strikebound takes a sympathetic look at one of the most significant events in the nation’s industrial history. The Sunbeam Colliery strike of 1937 was the first sit-in (occupation) by workers and its ultimate success provided a great boost for the Australian trade union movement – especially during the Depression when jobs were scarce and workers were not protected by many of the laws passed in the postwar era.” Read Kuipers’ extensive notes on the film.

What: Strikebound – film screening of digitally remastered Director’s Cut.

When: Thursday 13 October 5.30-7 pm

Where: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street, Melbourne.

Guest speaker: Director Richard Lowenstein

Bookings: FREE – register for tickets