Installation image. Hannah Pang: Double Happiness Portrait of a Chinese Wedding. Photo by Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2012.
    Installation image. Hannah Pang: Double Happiness Portrait of a Chinese Wedding. Photo by Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2012.
    Installation image. Hannah Pang: Double Happiness Portrait of a Chinese Wedding. Photo by Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2012.
    Installation image. Hannah Pang: Double Happiness Portrait of a Chinese Wedding. Photo by Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2012.
    Installation image. Hannah Pang: Double Happiness Portrait of a Chinese Wedding. Photo by Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2012.

Exhibitions

Hannah Pang: Double Happiness Portrait of a Chinese Wedding

17 Feb 2012 -
24 Mar 2012

RMIT Gallery
Melbourne
Victoria, Australia

Free

Fascinated by traditional Chinese embroidery and silk weaving, Hannah Pang started working in Suzhou, China, in 2001, specialising in the development and the production of fashion fabrics.

Pang made a name for herself as a leather and suede designer in Hong Kong in the 1980s. Her dynamic reinterpretation of materials attracted some of the world’s leading fashion designers such as Issey Miyake and Gianni Versace.

She focused on Chinese handicrafts like embroidery, hand painting and hand weaving. She has worked with Australian labels including Akira and Willow.

Pang currently divides her time between Shanghai, Hong Kong and Australia.

Her latest collection to be exhibited at RMIT Gallery is a contemporary interpretation of a 1930s and 40s Chinese Wedding in Shanghai and the surrounding region. The collection is a blend of traditional Chinese styles and Western influences.

Most of the fabrics for this collection have been specially developed using a combination of techniques including gradation hand-painting, tie dyeing, weaving and embroidery.

Pang enjoys exploring and pushing the boundaries of traditional handicrafts.

Pang applies different handicraft techniques on each piece. Most pieces start from a simple base fabric, hand painted in gradation colours. Then pleating, cut and fold motifs and embroidery are added. The cut and fold embroidery on different widths of pleating creates interesting looks.

There are hand woven pieces using different widths of silk ribbons. Some are space-dyed and some were Gold-edged by hand. On the hand woven bases Pang has also tested making 3-dimensional motifs.

 

Sponsor

This exhibition is supported by Jin Ze Art Centre, Shanghai.

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