Last day! Geniale Dilletanten exhibition ends 7 pm tonight

 

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The Geniale Dilletanten exhibition at RMIT Gallery incorporates a rich array of video and photographic material, audio samples, magazines, posters and other artefacts. Image: Exhibition opening, RMIT Gallery, 2015, Vicki Jones Photography

RMIT Gallery’s popular summer exhibition Geniale Dilletanten [Brilliant Dilletantes] Subculture in Germany in the 1980s + Australian Ingenious Amateurs must close at 7pm on Thursday 25 February.

This closing date is two days earlier than advertised, and necessary due to the exhibition’s Sydney opening in early March. So don’t miss out – come in during the day or after work on Thursday (we are open to 7pm) and immerse yourself in the radical movement and alternative artistic scene that exploded from Germany in the 1980s.

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The exhibition Geniale Dilletanten (Brilliant Dilletantes) presents the most comprehensive survey of 1980s German subculture to date. Image – White Night Melbourne opening, 2016, by RMIT Gallery.

RMIT Gallery also presents a flavour of what was happening locally from 1979 – 1989 through an exploration of Australian subculture.

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Audiences step back in time with an exploration of Australian subculture including the Little Band scene, the Clifton Hill Community Music Centre, and a group of young people who were part of the friendship circle of photographer Peter Milne. Image – White Night Melbourne opening, 2016, by RMIT Gallery.

And don’t forget to have one last ride on the Einstürzende Neubauten Klangbewegung Maschine by (((20Hz))) to really feel like you are in a 1980s Berlin club.

The audiokinetic jukebox was produced by Darrin Verhagen, RMIT researcher and senior lecturer in sound design and multisensory experience.

Using a six degrees of freedom motion simulator (and a reclaimed Audi passenger seat), the RMIT-based (((20Hz))) team provide an entertaining experience that takes audiences into the heart of German subculture music of the 1980s.

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Be transported – into your senses. Despite utilising a reclaimed Audi car seat, the The Klangbewegung Maschine only takes you into a visceral experience of the music of Einsturzende Naubatuen. Image White Night Melbourne opening, 2016, by RMIT Gallery

The ‘Klang Maschine’ has been likened to being in a mosh pit (without the smell!). It’s the perfect homage to the brief, bright reign of the Brilliant Amateur.

Exhibition must end 7pm on Thursday 25 February.

Exploring the legacy of 1980s subculture – Ash Wednesday & Darrin Verhagen

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Einsturzende Neubauten’s Klangbewegung Maschine by (((20Hz))). Photography: Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery.

Join us at RMIT Gallery on Tuesday 8 December 1-2 pm as sound artist and RMIT senior lecturer Darrin Verhagen and sound designer and musician Ash Wednesday discuss the legacy of 1980s subculture on their music and sound design.

Ash Wednesday is an innovative Australian synth pioneer and a member of self-styled groups, JAB (1976 – 1979) and MODELS (1979 – 1980), where he combined analog synthesizer and experimental tape textures with punk/rock rhythms. He continued working with electronics throughout the 80’s with numerous and diverse, but relatively low profile projects – most notably, perhaps, being ‘Modern Jazz’, an ingenious, impromptu assemblage of electro-based, musicians/non musicians, performing live on stage to a randomly programmed drum machine/sequencer beat.

Darrin will discuss the research behind the intriguing Einsturzende Neubauten’s Klangbewegung Maschine by (((20Hz))). This single participant installation for sound, movement, vibration and light invites participants to experience a viscerally embodied, multisensory internalization of three classic Einsturzende Neubauten tracks. The Klang is current installted in RMIT Gallery as part of the exhibition Geniale Dilletanten: Subculture in Germany in the 1980s.

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Einsturzende Neubauten’s Klangbewegung Maschine by (((20Hz))).  Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2015.

What: The legacy of 1980s subculture on sound design.

Who: Darrin Verhagen and Ash Wednesday

When: Tuesday 8 December 1-2 pm

Where: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street Melbourne.

Bookings: Free. (03) 9925 1717

Exploring movement: Performing Mobilities opens at RMIT Gallery

Sam Trubridge performs Night Walk outside RMIT Gallery for the opening night of Performing Mobilities. Photo: Vicki Jones Photography, 2015.

Sam Trubridge performs Night Walk outside RMIT Gallery for the opening night of Performing Mobilities. Photo: Vicki Jones Photography, 2015.

At the opening night of Performing Mobilities at RMIT Gallery on 24 September, audiences explored a series of projects that captured the traces of journey based projects over the last year. These form part of the exhibition, together with a series of mobile performances taking place in the Gallery and around the Gallery environment. So it was fitting that Sam Trubridge’s Night Walk launched the event.

The ominous black plastic bubble moved up and down Swanston Street before oozing up the RMIT Gallery steps.

Trubridge, a New Zealand artist, said that the bubble – a two and a half metre diameter sphere made from black plastic bags – is very fragile. However, visibility inside the inflated shape is actually rather good – about the same as if he was wearing sunglasses. Good to know when navigating traffic in the city streets!

“I walk it through various passages in the city. And the idea is the fragility of this object kind of allows it to be marked by its passage and by the features of the landscape that passes through, creating a trace or a map of that journey. And it slowly disintegrates as it goes until it becomes more slick and oil like or liquid movement sort of type spherical piece of architecture to something disintegrated or more threatening or more ghostly,” Trubridge said.

Sam Trubridge performs Night Walk at the opening of Performing Mobilities at RMIT Gallery. Photo Vicki Jones Photography, 2015.

Sam Trubridge performs Night Walk at the opening of Performing Mobilities at RMIT Gallery. Photo Vicki Jones Photography, 2015.

Exhibition curator Dr Mick Douglas, a Senior Lecturer at the School of Architecture & Design at RMIT, said Performing Mobilities (25 September – 24 October) explores the tensions between increasing mobilities in a global sense and ways of performative creative arts practice, trying to directly engage with these problematics of mobility and immobility, of the uneven distribution of mobility.

“The exhibition presents new, experimental work that explores the mobility of people, migration, the mobility of matter, and the mobility of non human species,” he said.

“The curation of the program brings these different projects into a relationship with each other so that the different art of these mobilities brush up against each other to reveal something new to us about worlds in motion.”

Getting to grips with Kaya Barry's Pan which activates an accumulating collection of moving panoramic images. Photo: Vicki Jones Photography, 2015.

Getting to grips with Kaya Barry’s Pan which activates an accumulating collection of moving panoramic images. Photo: Vicki Jones Photography, 2015.

Performing Mobilities invites us to challenge ourselves about the way in which we think about and experience mobility. The exhibition was opened by Professor Maaike Bleeker, President of Performance Studies international (Psi), and Chair of Theatre Studies, Utrecht University.

The series of projects in different ways challenge us to re-engage in a way in which mobility affects us in our everyday lives, challenges us to think about our relationships to territory, to land, to the relationship with borders and how borders are monitored.

Playing around with David Thomas & Laurene Vaughan's participatory performance work

Playing around with David Thomas & Laurene Vaughan’s participatory performance work “Taking a Line for a Walk’. Photo: Vicki Jones Photography, 2015.

A number of projects invite you to leave the Gallery with a particular aspect of an artwork, some of the mobile performances invite you to walk with the artist encountering the city through the lens of the artist. Douglas explains “It starts to have us rethink and reimagine these relationships between our embodied experience and mobility and its significance in the world today.”

Douglas said some projects such as ‘A few Steps Not Here Not There’ by Mammad Aidani, Omid Movafgh, Mike Fard, Moshen Panahi and Hada Kazemitame is an installation exploring asylum seekers’ experiences of displacement. Dr Mammad Aidani has a PhD in hermeneutics and phenomenological psychology, and an MA in sociolinguistics and identity. His current research project focuses on perceptions, interpretations and ways of trauma and suffering amongst Iranian diaspora men.

“The project undertaken by Iranian asylum seekers, over two generations opens up to us ways of thinking about experience of asylum seeking,” Douglas said.

“What it is trying to do is help refugees come to terms to living in a new city, to explore the tensions between one place of origin and a place of current inhabitation.”

“A few Steps Not Here Not There’ creates an intimate setting for experiencing the looping film and encountering the original text of this installation exploring asylum seekers’ experience of displacement. Photo: Vicki Jones Photography, 2015.

The works in the program are all experimental and new works from the Australasian region. They particularly try and explore the local relevance but also the global relevance in mobilities.

Douglas said that Graham Miller’s work is the only internationally invited work and it plays a really pivotal role in helping us negotiate this tension between locality and globality.

“His project Beheld has been documenting where stowaways have fallen to ground from planes. It’s a really haunting project that reveals to us an Australian incident of this tragic circumstance of desperate forms of migration,” Douglas said.

Graeme Miller (left) and Mammad Aidani contemplate the latest Australian based addition of Miller's installation Beheld, which documents sites where stowaways have tragically fallen from planes. This was taken at Sydney airport, which was the site of such an accident in 1970. Photo; Vicki Jones Photography, 2015.

Graeme Miller (left) and Mammad Aidani contemplate the latest Australian based addition of Miller’s installation Beheld, which documents sites where stowaways have tragically fallen from planes. This was taken at Sydney airport, which was the site of such an accident in 1970. Photo; Vicki Jones Photography, 2015.

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Easter opening times at RMIT Gallery

Enjoying the exhibition Unfolding: New Indian Textiles at RMIT Gallery. Image - Vicki Jones Photography, 2015.

Enjoying the exhibition Unfolding: New Indian Textiles at RMIT Gallery. Image – Vicki Jones Photography, 2015.

RMIT Gallery’s opening times over the Easter break are as follows:

Good Friday April 3rd: CLOSED

Saturday April 4th: 12-5PM – normal Saturday viewing times

Sunday April 5th: CLOSED

Monday April 6th: CLOSED

Tuesday April 7th: 11-5PM – normal times resume

Wednesday April 8: 11-7 pm (late night viewing)

If you are in the Melbourne CBD when we are open, please drop in to our three new exhibitions – Unfolding: New Indian Textiles; Backs of Banaras; Japanese Art After Fukushima: Return of Godzilla.
And to everyone – sincere wishes for a safe and peaceful time of the year.

Come and play at Experimenta Recharge: now open at RMIT Gallery

Paranoia, 2010, reactive sculpture 15 x 11 x 20 cm by Anaisa Franco. Photo by Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

Paranoia, 2010,
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15 x 11 x 20 cm by Anaisa Franco. Photo by Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

Today at RMIT Gallery something has been screaming non stop – it’s Anaisa Franco reactive sculpture “Paranoia” and the Experimenta Recharge audience are delighting in standing close and watching (and hearing) those false teeth scream!

The screaming (and laughing) teeth are part of the Brazilian artist’s Psychosomatic series: Paranoia (2010), Frustration (2012), and Emanating Happiness (2014); reactive sculptures that create an endless loop of emotional responses between her artworks and audience.

Inspired by psychology, dreams and the possibilities inherent in DIY electrical engineering, Anaisa animates objects with behaviours and feelings to blur the boundaries between body, mind and machine. Each electronic sculpture embodies a particular emotion and highlights the potential of the digital to reconnect us with latent human emotions and the potential uses of digital interfaces.

‘Paranoia’ is one of three of Anaisa’s artworks on display at the 6th International Biennial of Media Art at RMIT Gallery until 21 February 2015…and yes, it screams.

Artist Ei Wada plays with Anaisa Franco's sensitive sculpture  'Frustration' at Experimenta Recharge.

Artist Ei Wada plays with Anaisa Franco’s sensitive sculpture ‘Frustration’ at Experimenta Recharge. Photo by Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

A little more quiet is Frustration 2012, a sensitive sculpture. Anaisa, who was born in Sao Paulo, Brazil and lives Berlin, Germany, works with robotics and low-fi electronics to produce interactive sculptures and installation that connect mechanical processes with the subconscious human mind. At the Experimenta Recharge opening weekend arts seminar, Anaisa talked about the role of the body as a holder of knowledge and memory in her work. With a mother who is a psychologist, Anaisa said she naturally gravitated to the ideas arising from psychology for inspiration in her artwork.

Anaisa Franco's Emanating Happiness 2014, interactive sculpture, wood, LED neon flex. Image: Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

Anaisa Franco’s Emanating Happiness 2014, interactive sculpture, wood, LED neon flex. Image: Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

Anaisa’s work Emanating Happiness, 2014 is an interactive sculpture that generates an exuberant and colorful light wave when people walk on it. The work is part of Psychosomatic Series.

It has been developed during an artist in residence program at Creative and Cognition Studios, University of Technology, Sydney, November, 2014, as part of the EMARE AUS CDN Move On Exchange (European media artists in residence in exchange with Australia and Canada). This program is supported by the Culture 2013 Programme of the European Commission and the Goethe Institute.

Anaisa has a Master in Digital Art and Technology at University of Plymouth in England and graduated in Visual Arts at FAAP in Sao Paulo. She has been exhibiting internationally around the world.

Anaisa Franco's Emanating Happiness 2014, interactive sculpture, wood, LED neon flex. Image: Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

Anaisa Franco’s Emanating Happiness 2014, interactive sculpture, wood, LED neon flex. Image: Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

A decade ago, Anaisa revealed to an art magazine her dream of one day creating a biological
species of robots. “The central idea would be to produce beings that were self-programmed, self-developed, self-reproducing, beings that lack patterns and rules to control them. I would…build an alive house, where all inanimate things would be alive and genetically modified. In this new world new forms of life could evolve.” With her interactive sculptures at Experimenta Recharge, it is possible to see how the artist has pursued an aspect of that dream.

Exhibition: Experimenta Recharge: 6th International Biennial of Media Art

Artist: Anaisa Franco

Works: Psychosomatic series: Paranoia (2010), Frustration (2012), and Emanating Happiness (2014)

Venue: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street, Melbourne.

Dates: Now showing until 21 February 2015