Vale Peter Corrigan AM – ‘maverick’ architect prepared to take risks

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Architectural model, Peter Corrigan: Cities of Hope, RMIT Gallery 2013. Installation image by Mark Ashkanasy

Vale Peter Corrigan AM – RMIT Architecture Professor and RAIA Gold Medal winning architect, well known for designing RMIT’s Building 8 – a campus landmark and city icon.

RMIT Gallery’s Cities of Hope exhibition in 2013 paid tribute to Corrigan’s creative achievements across architecture and set design, and explored his status as a ‘maverick designer’ prepared to take risks.

RMIT Gallery Director Suzanne Davies said her intrigue and respect for Peter Corrigan’s creative output and teaching made the idea of an exhibition immediately compelling both in the achievements of the architectural firm Corrigan and Edmond along with Corrigan’s work in theatre.

“Throughout, it is the voice and vision of Peter Corrigan, nudging, guiding, shaping, challenging, provoking, transforming, enabling and seducing, that we hear and see in all their contrarian passion.”

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Installation image, Peter Corrigan: Cities of Hope, RMIT Gallery, 2013. Image by Mark Ashkanasy.

Corrigan, who has passed away on 1 December 2016,  was a professor of architecture at RMIT since 1975. In 2013, the Institute awarded him the Neville Quarry Architectural Education Prize. Read more.

“I first became aware of Peter Corrigan’s energy and influence as a teacher at the time RMIT became publisher of the architectural journal Transition and then through his theatre work having been engaged to photograph a set and costumes,” Ms Davies said.

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Peter Corrigan set design, Cities of Hope, RMIT Gallery 2013, photo by Mark Ashkanasy

Peter Corrigan: Cities of Hope traced the creative focus of the remarkable Australian architect, bringing to life many of his designs over four decades including architectural models and drawings by Edmond and Corrigan; set and costume designs for theatre; artworks, records and notations from his personal collection and key works selected from public collections which have enriched his practice.

“Peter Corrigan always made it clear to RMIT Gallery the need to be mindful of historical context. He attended thoughtfully to most if not all our exhibitions.”

Opening night images: new exhibitions at RMIT Gallery

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(left to right) Elizabeth Gower and Leslie Cannold at the opening night of Gower’s exhibition ‘he loves me, he loves me not’ at RMIT Gallery.

Two new exhibitions at RMIT Gallery explore the ways women still feel culturally conditioned and socially obligated to seek male approval. Elizabeth Gower’s he loves me, he loves me not and Mithu Sen + Pushpa Rawat’s Quiet Voices were opened on Thursday 10 March by ethicist Dr Leslie Cannold and journalist and author Sushi Das.

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(left to right) RMIT Gallery director Suzanne Davies and journalist and author Sushi Das, who opened Mithu Sen + Pushpa Rawat’s exhibition Quiet Voices.

Dr Leslie Cannold said that the mere idea of Gower’s exhibition moved her so much and asked her to question why it is that women ask ‘does he loves me’ rather than ‘do I love myself?”

“Standing among the suspended panels, seeing the words repeated over and over again in the gallery space, I am even more moved by Gower’s work when I see it in the flesh,” Cannold said.

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Endless: Elizabeth Gower wrote the phrase ‘he loves me, he loves me not’ 21,319 times, painstakingly transcribed on 20 lengths of semi-transparent drafting film suspended from floor to ceiling in RMIT Gallery.

Sushi Das, The Age opinion editor, said Quiet Voices poetically address issues women in India face with obligation, patriarchy and the inter-generational dynamic. Das, author of the memoir Deranged Marriage said the works by Mithu Sen + Pushpa Rawat strongly address how women are conditioned to seek approval not only from their parents, but everyone, including their husband, bosses, even their children.

“We might not understand the language in these films, but instinctively relate to them and see within them the seed of women’s potential, no matter when that decision to break free from expectation finally comes, and for some, it isn’t until menopause or when they become grandmothers.”

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Pushpa Rawat’s film Nirnay (Decision) explores the journey of young, educated women on the outskirts of Delhi who feel powerlessly obligated when it comes to taking any major decision regarding their future.

On Thursday 7 April from 5.30-6.30, RMIT Gallery will be holding a free panel discussion on “seeking Approval: A question of power, gender or culture?”

Speakers Dr Elizabeth Gower (artist, educator), Dr Leslie Cannold (ethicist, researcher, author The Book of Rachael, What, No Baby? The Abortion Myth), Sushi Das (Opinion Editor, The Age, author Deranged Marriage) and Dr Meagan Tyler (RMIT Vice-Chancellor’s Research Fellow, editor Freedom Fallacy: The limits of liberal feminism) will explore women’s power struggles across different generations and cultures, including sexual violence and intimate partner violence, the need to please, and the ways the arts and the digital sphere provide an arena for women’s voices to be heard.

Free click here – bookings necessary

 

March exhibitions opening at RMIT Gallery

Please join us Thursday 10 March 6-8 pm to celebrate the opening of three exhibitions by leading Australian artists Richard Bell and Elizabeth Gower, internationally acclaimed artist Mithu Sen and emerging film maker Pushpa Rawat.

Richard Bell | Imagining Victory 

Opening Night: Thursday 10 March | 6-8pm  – All welcome
Exhibition Dates: 11 March – 23 April

Opening Speaker | Professor Paul Gough, Pro Vice-Chancellor and Vice President, College of Design and Social Context, RMIT University Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor Academic and Vice-President, RMIT University

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About the exhibition
Curator: Alexie Glass-Kantor | Artist: Richard Bell
Drawing heavily upon the mechanisms of activism, this significant solo exhibition by leading Australian artist Richard Bell is centred on a trilogy of recent video projects that attempts to dig beneath the veneer of cultural integration to expose how racism can be deeply embedded and passed on to future generations.
An Artspace exhibition toured by Museums & Galleries of NSW.

Richard Bell has just been announced as the recipient of a prestigious Australia Council Visual Arts Award.

The 2016 Australia Council awards honour eight distinguished Australian artists who have made an exceptional contribution to the arts over many years.   These prestigious national awards combine long-standing lifetime and outstanding achievement awards in music, literature, community arts and cultural development, visual arts, theatre, dance, and emerging and experimental arts.

Now in its second year, the Australia Council Awards ceremony will be held in Sydney on Thursday, 10 March, so unfortunately Richard Bell will be unable to attend the RMIT Gallery opening of his exhibition.

Richard Bell has held a number of solo exhibitions since 1990 and works across a variety of media, including painting, installation, performance and video. His work explores the complex artistic and political problems of Western, colonial and Indigenous art production. He is represented in major collections in Australia and New Zealand and has had significant solo exhibitions internationally, including at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam this year. His work Embassy will feature in the 20th Biennale of Sydney in March. He received the Telstra National Aboriginal Art Award in 2003. Richard is part of the Proppa Now Collective in Brisbane, which mentors young Indigenous artists.

RMIT Gallery Elizabeth Gower evite

Elizabeth Gower | he loves me, he loves me not  

Elizabeth Gower | he loves me, he loves me not  
Opening Night: Thursday 10 March | 6-8pm   – All welcome
Exhibition Dates: 11 March – 23 April
Opening SpeakerDr Leslie Cannold Ethicist, researcher, author
About the exhibition

Curator: Suzanne Davies | Artist: Elizabeth Gower

Women in all cultures are encouraged to seek validation at an early age, by conforming to prescribed behaviours, sanctioned body image, fashion, career and lifestyle choices. In the handwritten phrase he loves me, he loves me not RMIT Alumnus Elizabeth Gower poses the question 21,319 times symbolically representing a lifetime of re-evaluation and wavering, resilience and resolve.

 

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Mithu Sen and Pushpa Rawat | Quiet Voices

Opening Night: Thursday 10 March | 6-8pm  – All welcome
Exhibition Dates: 11 March – 23 April

Opening Speaker | Ms Sushi Das Opinion Editor, The Age, author

The works by Mithu Sen and Pushpa Rawat poetically address issues women face with obligation,patriarchy and the inter-generational dynamic.

For her multi-media installation I have only one language; it is not mine renowned Delhi-based artist Mithu Sen spent time at a Kerala orphanage to experience firsthand what life was like for these marginalised young girls. Nirnay (Decision) the debut film of director Pushpa Rawat explores Pushpa’s journey and that of her young, educated women friends on the outskirts of Delhi who feel powerlessly obligated when it comes to taking any major decision regarding their future.

 

Book now! Geniale Dilletanten: Brilliant Dilletantes – public program events

RMIT.GenDill.FINALEVITEwebresRMIT Gallery’s exhibition Geniale Dilletanten (Brilliant Dilletantes): Subculture in Germany in the 1980s (Nov 13 – 27 Feb 2016) presents a comprehensive survey of 1980s German subculture: a rich array of video, audio, photos, record covers, gig posters and other artefacts.

Initiated and curated by the Goethe-Institut, the exhibition showcases the work of experimental bands such as Einstürzende Neubauten, Deutsch-Amerikanische Freundschaft (DAF) and Die Tödliche Doris, as well as visual artists, filmmakers and designers from West and East Germany.

As part of the exhibition, RMIT Gallery presents + Australian ingenious amateurs – a flavour of what was happening in Melbourne from 1979 – 1989 through an exploration of Australian subculture that was characterised by large numbers of short-lived bands, more concerned with artistic expression than mainstream.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a rich program of concerts, panel discussions, and artist talks featuring eyewitness accounts by protagonists such as Einstürzende Neubauten and Automat guitarist Jochen Arbeit and Love Parade founder Dr Motte, who were involved in the scene at the time and have been active artists since then.

Opening Night Party: Thursday 12. November 2015, 6-8 pm. All welcome. German 80s subculture music to be played by Tony Irvine, 3PBSFM.

RSVP: 03 9925 1717 or rmit.gallery@rmit.edu.au

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Film Screening: B-MOVIE: LUST & SOUND IN WEST-BERLIN
A fast-paced documentary by British film maker Mark Reeder of mostly unreleased footage from a frenzied but creative decade, starting with punk and ending with the Love Parade: B-Movie: The movie
Date: Friday, 13. November 2015. Time:  6-8 pm. With a pre-screening introduction by curator Mathilde Weh and Professor Alison Lewis, and Australian writer & Berlin resident Stuart Braun whose new book City of Exiles: Berlin from the Outside In features research that draws from his interviews with Mark Reeder, the film director.
Venue: RMIT Gallery, Storey Hall Auditorium, 344 Swanston Street, Melbourne, VIC 3000
Free entry.
Booking required: https://b-movie.eventbrite.com.au

Mathilde Weh at the Geniale Dilletanten exhibition, Haus der Kunst, Munich.

Mathilde Weh at the Geniale Dilletanten exhibition, Haus der Kunst, Munich.

Artist Talk: Curating SUBCULTURE
RMIT Gallery Director Suzanne Davies & curator Mathilde Weh in conversation
Date: Monday, 16 November 2015. Time: 1pm – 2pm
Venue: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street, Melbourne, VIC 3000
Free entry.

Musician Penny Ikinger. Photo by Marilyn Jeanette.

Musician Penny Ikinger. Photo by Marilyn Jeanette.

Artist Talk: The Subversive Voice: Women in the Arts in the 1980s
Curator Mathilde Weh in conversation with musician Penny Ikinger about the role that women played in the art and music scene of the 1980s
Date: Tuesday, 17 November 2015. Time: 1-2 pm
Venue: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street, Melbourne, VIC 3000. Free entry.

RMIT_2015HoffLecture_new_webPanel discussion: “The Influence and Legacy of 1980s German Subculture” (2015 Ursula Hoff Contemporary Lecture)
Speakers: Moderator Dr Stuart Grant, Dr Motte, Jochen Arbeit, Mathilde Weh, Jenny Watson, Ash Wednesday
Date: Friday, 20 November 2015. Time: 5.30-7 pm
venue: RMIT Storey Hall Green Brain Seminar Room, Level 7, 342 Swanston Street
Free entry. Booking required: https://ursulahofflecture.eventbrite.com.au

Live-Concert: AUTOMAT from Berlin
Berlin post-industrial dub-rock trio featuring Jochen Arbeit (Einstürzende Neubauten, Die Haut), Achim Färber (Project Pitchfork, Prag) and Georg Zeitblom (Sovetskoe Foto). Automat live in Australia.
Date: Friday, 20 November 2015. Time: 8.00pm
Venue: John Curtin Hotel, 29 Lygon St, Carlton VIC 3053
Entry: $20 + Booking Fee: http://bit.ly/1S8rEoj

Darren Verhagen and the 'klang maschine

Darrin Verhagen and the ‘klang maschine”

Artist Talk: The “Klangbewegung Maschine” (please note the date for this talk has been changed due to illness. We apologise for any inconvenience.)
Sound artist Darrin Verhagen and musician Ash Wednesday (Einstürzende Neubauten) discuss the legacy of the 1980s subculture and its music and the creation of the sound-installation “Klangbewegung Maschine”.

This audiokinetic jukebox is a single participant installation for sound, movement, sensed vibration and light. Sitting in a reclaimed Audi passenger seat, the participant selects their preferred Neubauten composition, Merle (Drawings of Patient OT), Prologue or Feurio (Haus Der Leuge). The music is thrown into movement by a six degrees of freedom motion simulator, extended into vibration through a bass transducer and transmuted into light via eyelid-projections controlled by sound.

NEW Date: Tuesday 8 December Time: 1 – 2 pm Venue: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street. Melbourne. Free entry.

Stuart Braun

Stuart Braun

Book Talk:  Berlin from the Outside In
Australian writer & Berlin resident Stuart Braun discusses his new book City of Exiles: Berlin from the Outside In with photographer Peter Milne. Stuart interviewed Mark Reeder, the central character in the film B-Movie: Lust & Sound in West-Berlin, and that research features extensively in City of Exiles.

Stuart Braun completed a doctorate in history before living across Asia, Australia and Europe and publishing widely as a journalist and writer. Moving to Berlin in 2009, he soon started working on his ode to his adopted city, City of Exiles: Berlin from the Outside In (2015), a book that explores why Berlin has long held a special allure for visionary artists, musicians and free spirits from around the world – including Iggy Pop, who graces the cover.

Peter Milne is a documentary photographer known for his documentation of Australian Independent rock band Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds in the early 1990s. In 1992, Milne toured Europe with the band and his photographs reflect the everyday realities of the tour from the ‘Boredom of the Road’ in Germany and backstage glimpses, to the glamour stage shots of band members and images of adoring fans.
Date: Thursday, 3 December  2015. Time: 5.30-6.30 pm
Venue: RMIT Gallery,  344 Swanston Street, Melbourne.
Free entry

Vale Robyn Beeche – remembering the magic

Richard Dunn, Emeritus Professor of Contemporary Visual Art at the University of Sydney, and Robyn Beeche, at the opening of Fashion Face, RMIT Gallery 2007.

Richard Dunn, Emeritus Professor
of Contemporary Visual Art at the University of
Sydney, and Robyn Beeche, at the opening of Fashion Face, RMIT Gallery 2007.

RMIT Gallery Director Suzanne Davies and the staff at RMIT Gallery wish to express our sadness at the passing of Australian photographer Robyn Beeche, and share some of the magical creative activities in which she engaged.

Fashion Face: Fashion photography by Robyn Beeche 1979-1989 2 March - 14 April 2007 RMIT Gallery, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Fashion Face: Fashion photography by Robyn Beeche 1979-1989
2 March – 14 April 2007
RMIT Gallery, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

A photographer in the heart of London’s fashion world in the 1980s, Robyn had an eye for the fantastic and a vivid imagination. She pioneered a photographic style that transcended straight fashion photography and introduced scenarios that privileged fantasy, magic and illusion.
She is celebrated for her ground-breaking pre-Photoshop photographs of painted bodies collaborating with legendary make-up artists Richard Sharah, Phyllis Cohen and Richard Sharples. She created many iconic images – from Visage’s Fade to Grey album cover, to the “puritan” image which inspired David Bowie’s Ashes to Ashes film clip.
Ms Davies said that RMIT Gallery was so proud to have curated, with Robyn Beeche, the exhibition
Fashion Face: Fashion photography by Robyn Beeche 1979-1989, a survey exhibition of Beeche’s significant works in fashion and fine art photography, from 2 March to 14 April 2007.
Fashion Face: Fashion photography by Robyn Beeche 1979-1989 2 March - 14 April 2007 RMIT Gallery, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Fashion Face: Fashion photography by Robyn Beeche 1979-1989
2 March – 14 April 2007
RMIT Gallery, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

In her catalogue essay of the exhibition, Jennifer Phipps acknowledged discussions she had with Robyn Beeche. Phipps writes: “In 1980s’ London, Beeche kept an open studio for innovative artists in fashion and in hair and make-up. Costs were shared and people worked co-operatively. For these portraits, elaborate make-up that could take twelve hours to apply was first drawn up on paper, lighting was calculated meticulously and there was little thought of personal reward in a heated atmosphere of mutual creativity.”
Fashion Face: Fashion photography by Robyn Beeche 1979-1989 2 March - 14 April 2007 RMIT Gallery, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Fashion Face: Fashion photography by Robyn Beeche 1979-1989
2 March – 14 April 2007
RMIT Gallery, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Robyn Beeche moved from Sydney to London in the mid-1970s, and in 1985 based herself in Vrindavan, India documenting the festivals and culture of the region known as Vraj.
Ms Davies remembered Robyn as “a most generous friend with whom we shared our passion for India.”
RMIT Gallery Kindness/Udarta Australia-India Cultural Exchange 29 June – 25 August 2012 Curator: Suzanne Davies

RMIT Gallery
Kindness/Udarta
Australia-India Cultural Exchange
29 June – 25 August 2012
Curator: Suzanne Davies

“In 2012 Robyn was important to an RMIT exhibition and publication, Kindness/Udarta in Delhi, Canberra and Melbourne. Beyond these projects, Robyn enabled so may other initiatives and friendships. Her warmth and caring seemed to know no limits. While our world feels now a lesser place, given her faith and grace Robyn will be in perfect peace.”
Radhe radhe Robyn.