Oceans: new and classic electro-acoustic compositions

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Caption: Portal (RMIT) merged with Seascape, by Finnegan Comte-Harvey, 2017

Join us at RMIT for two nights of new works and classics of the electro-acoustic repertoire inspired by the sounds of oceans.

The free events will be held at RMIT Storey Hall Auditorium, City campus, Level 5, 336-348 Swanston Street, Melbourne.

Presented by RMIT Gallery in partnership with SIAL (Spatial Information Architecture Laboratory) Sound Studios, the concerts feature works by established and emerging composers from Australia, Canada, Italy, France, NZ, UK and Norway, including the world premiere of Ocean Deep by Canadian composer Barry Truax, who specializes in real-time implementations of granular synthesis, often of sampled sounds, and soundscapes.

Curation and sound diffusion: Lawrence Harvey.

Tuesday 2 May 6-8 pm – BOOK NOW

Buoy (2011) David Berezan (Canada/UK)

La vie en bleu (2013-2014) Anna Raimondo (Italy)

And then the sea came back (2016) Anja Kanngieser / Polly Stanton (Australia).

Island (2000) Barry Truax (Canada)

Prospero’s Voyage (2004) Barry Truax (Canada)

Spring Bloom in the Marginal Ice Zone (2017) Jana Winderen (Norway)

Wednesday 3 May 6-8 pm – BOOK NOW

Tides: Sea Flight (1984) Denis Smalley (NZ/UK)

frostbYte: cHaTter (2012) Daniel Blinkhorn (Australia)

Billy sees inside the sea (2016) Jane Ullman (Australia)

HydroSonics (2016) Leah Barclay (Australia)

Poranui (2011-12) Reuben Derrick (NZ)

Ocean Deep. World Premiere of new version (2017) Barry Truax (Canada)

After the Big Bang – Korinsky’s sound installation in Experimenta Recharge

 

Abel Korinsky with his work Korinsky Collective: RL2000 2014 sound and mixed media installation dimensions variable. Photo Evelyn Tsitas, RMIT Gallery, 2014

Abel Korinsky with his work  RL2000 2014
sound and mixed media installation
dimensions variable. Photo Evelyn Tsitas, RMIT Gallery, 2014

We are all fascinated by artistic practice and the ‘working out’ of process that offers us a ‘behind the scenes’ glimpse of how creative work is developed. But what of the finished product?

German sound artist Abel Korinsky, who is in Melbourne on a two month residency with Experimenta and RMIT, gave audiences an insight into his process when he joined theoretical astrophysicist Dr Katie Mack and RMIT’s Lawrence Harvey, Associate Professor and Director of SIAL Sound Studios, on 29 October, 2014 at RMIT Gallery to talk about space – art – and Big Bang Sounds.

Missed the talk? Catch up with the podcast and blog – click here.

You can now see Abel Korinsky’s finished artwork using the ideas of the resonance of Big Bang sounds as inspiration for RL2000, by visiting the exhibition Experimenta Recharge: 6th International Biennial of Media Art at RMIT Gallery until 21 February.

Korinsky’s artwork RL2000 2014,sound and mixed media installation, picks up on the ideas he discussed in the Melbourne Knowledge Week talk available on podcast, and asks audiences to imagine that sound never fully disappears and is present in our universe forever. What would it sound like to hear all the sounds of the past and present? How would it change our perceptions of time and death?

Korinsky Collective: RL2000 2014 sound and mixed media installation dimenions variable. Photo Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2014

Korinsky Collective: RL2000 2014
sound and mixed media installation
dimensions variable. Photo Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2014

As part of the sound artist collective Korinsky (together with his twin brother Carlo, and younger brother Max) Abel presents the sound piece in an immersive installation inspired by the recent announcement by researchers at the Harvard-Smithsonian Centre that they had documented sound waves from the Big Bang soon after the birth of our universe. In a room in RMIT Gallery where the work is exhibited, when the lights go off intermittently the audience is plunged into darkness which quickly fills with fluorescent glow of paint on the spider-like central pod that is reminiscent perhaps of a 1950s Sci Fi movie set design. 

Korinsky Collective: RL2000 2014 sound and mixed media installation dimenions variable. Photo Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2014

Korinsky Collective: RL2000 2014
sound and mixed media installation
dimensions variable. Photo Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2014

The artists invite audiences to imagine the implications of hearing sounds from the past and to place themselves in a situation where perceptions of time, space and place might be disrupted.

Korinsky’s work has been developed during a residency with Experimenta as part of the EMARE AUS
CDN Move On Exchange (European media artists in residence in exchange with Australia and
Canada). This program is supported by the Culture 2013 Programme of the European Commission.

ABEL KORINSKY IN APHRA MAGAZINE

Experimenta artist Abel Korinsky – who will speak about his work at RMIT Gallery tonight in the Big Bang Sounds event – is featured in a new article by APHRA magazine online.

Abel Korinsky one of the three brothers in the Korinsky collective (Germany). Their immersive installations and public sound works explore the emotional and physical effects of directional sound. Implementing their own  custom-developed software called ‘Vertical Sound Lab’, Korinsky produce highly rich, multi-layered auditory and visual illusions.
On Wednesday 29 October from 5.30-7 pm, Abel will join Lawrence Harvey, Associate Professor and Director SIAL Sound Studios, RMIT University and American astrophysicist Dr Katie Mack about dark matter, black holes and how new research and finding may change our lives in the future.
IMG_5448
Abel Korinsky is Experiment’a artist-in-residence as part of the EMARE AUS CDN Move On Exchange (European Media Artists in Residence Exchange with Australia and Canada). This program is supported by the Culture 2013 Program of the European Commission and the Goethe Institut. Abel is pictured above with (far right) Gabriele Urban, Cultural officer from the Goethe-Institut Australien (Melbourne) at the recent Recharge Experimenta sixth international of biennial art launch.

Abel Korinsky is hosted by RMIT School of Art International Artist in Residency Program.

To learn more about Korinsky’s work read the APHRA article here.
A new work by Korinsky is included in the upcoming Experimenta Recharge 6th International Biennial of Media Art exhibition held at RMIT Gallery from 28 November 2014 to 21 February 2015.
Seating limited for the Big Bang Sounds talk: Bookings essential: (03) 9925 1717.

Can sound be sculpture?

 

 

Can sound be sculpture? Hear it in Bill Fontana‘s beautiful Kiribilli Wharf room at RMIT Gallery when the new exhibition Revelations: Sculpture from The RMIT Art Collection is opened tonight by Ken Scarlett OAM at 6pm on 22 May 2014.  Ken Scarlett‘s publication Australian Sculptors was the first to present a complete survey of sculpture in Australia.

The sound sculpture room was designed to complement the Fontana work by curator Jon Buckingham. He says “we have presented Kiribilli Wharf here with a lighting component designed to de-emphasize the conventional ‘white cube’ of the gallery space, and to create a truly immersive experience. “

In his catalogue essay, Jon Buckingham writes;

That innovation is such an integral part of contemporary sculptural practice suggests that it isn’t simply a deliberate recycling of form. Krauss’ expanded field is a reformulation of what can be considered sculpture – a broadening of the term in line with an increasingly diverse approach to practice, but still within a closely defined set of parameters. This properly allows for the inclusion of works like Bill Fontana’s Kirribilli Wharf and Reko Rennie’s I wear my own crown, which use sound and light respectively to express form. Artist Gareth Jones finds this problematic: in jettisoning the concept of sculpture as object, sculpture risks losing the identity that defines it. Though one can respect this line of reasoning, it seems overly reductive. Fontana and Rennie’s works are just further examples of truth-to-materials, addressing the subject of sound with sound, light with light.  This is not to suggest that these works are simply formal experiments; both works are profoundly concerned with establishing a sense of place, and in Rennie’s case, a sense of identity as well.

Bill Fontana (b. 1947)

Kirribilli Wharf, 1976

8 channel sound installation

edition 2/3

duration 27 min 53 sec (looped)

Purchased through the RMIT Art Fund, 2012

Sound Art Collection

RMIT University Art Collection SA.2013.3