Last week of Quiddity and Light moves: Contemporary Australian Video Art

Our current exhibitions Quiddity and Light moves: Contemporary Australian Video Art end this Saturday 20 August. Don’t miss out – come on in and remember we are open to 7 pm on Thursday and from 12-5pm on Saturday.

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The Quiddity curatorium holding the Quiddity catalogue – complete with a critical Q & A from the team in which they explore the ‘slightly challenging schism between [exhibition] conception and implementation.”

Curated by RMIT Gallery in collaboration with interns from the RMIT Master of Arts Management courseQuiddity provided students the opportunity to put the skills they have learned into practice and tests whether theory can stand up to the real-time practicalities of curation in a public art gallery.

The conceptualisation and implementation of the exhibition which explores a ‘behind the scenes’ approach to the RMIT Art Collection are detailed in the Quiddity catalogue (selling for $5) and will be discussed at the final public program on Thursday 18 August from 5.30-6.30 pm along with guest speakers Professor David Forrest, HRD Coordinator, RMIT School of Art, and David Sequeira, a visual artist, art/business consultant and freelance museum education professional.

Prospective students wanting to find out more about the RMIT Master of Arts (Art Management) program would also find the session particularly useful.

Don’t forget to see our video art exhibition while you are at RMIT Gallery this week.

Light moves: Contemporary Australian Video Art is a touring exhibition from the National Gallery of Australia, featuring work by 

  • Daniel Crooks
  • Hayden Fowler
  • Shaun Gladwell
  • Gabriella and Silvana Mangano
  • David Rosetzky
  • Julie Rrap
  • Christian Thompson

Visitors have been mesmerised by the exhibition’s images of bodies moving through space and also by the diversity of work by Australian artists of the highest calibre. In particular, the exhibition is a wonderful opportunity for students in particular to explore a diversity of screen-based work and see how artists use the medium to create conceptual works that speak to their own personal interests and histories.

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Light moves: Contemporary Australian Video Art. Installation image by Tobias Titz, RMIT Gallery, 2016.

What: Quiddity and Light moves: Contemporary Australian Video Art

When: Both exhibitions end Saturday 20 August at 5 pm

Where: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street, Melbourne, 3000.

RMIT Gallery hours: Mon-Fri 11 am – 5 pm/ Thurs 11-7 pm, Saturday 12 noon – 5 pm.

Quiddity catalogue: $5 – available at the front desk, RMIT Gallery.

Wrapping it Up: Quiddity panel Discussion – Thursday 18 August 5.30-6.30 pm. Free – register here

 

RMIT Open Day 2016 – visit RMIT Gallery

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Quiddity installation image by Tobias Titz, RMIT Gallery, 2016.

Come inside RMIT Gallery while you explore the RMIT city campus on 14 August during Open Day. The gallery will be open from 10 am – 4 pm, and you can check out the last week of our current exhibitions. Both exhibitions end on 20 August.

Quiddity provides a behind-the-scenes peek into the RMIT Art Collection, and Light moves: Contemporary Australian Video Art features innovative work from top Australian artists, including RMIT alumni Christian Thompson. In 2010 Thompson became the first Aboriginal Australian to be admitted into the University of Oxford in its 900-year history. He holds a Doctorate of Philosophy (Fine Art), Trinity College, University of Oxford, Britain, Master of Theatre, Amsterdam School of Arts, Das Arts, The Netherlands, Masters of Fine Art (Sculpture) RMIT University and Honours (Sculpture) RMIT University, and a Bachelor of Fine Art from the University of Southern Queensland.

 

Christian Thompson

LIGHT MOVES IMAGE Christian Thompson, HEAT 2010. Three channel digital video, sound, duration 5 minutes 52 seconds. Collection of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra

 

RMIT Open Day is on 14 August from 10-4 pm. Plan your Open Day

 

RMIT Gallery is RMIT University’s premier exhibition gallery, presenting an exemplary professional program of local, Australian and international creative works, research outcomes and cultural stories that promote social and academic interaction between the university and a global public with a focus on external partnerships and digital dissemination.

The public exhibition program delivers unique visceral experiences of visual art, new media, and sonic art, design popular culture, science technology and art fusions in its five museum standard spaces.

Come and see us! We are at 344 Swanston Street, right next to the Storey Hall entrance.
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RMIT Gallery (right) is located at 344 Swanston Street. The front facade’s classical design is dominated by the Corinthian columns set on a high base of Malmsbury bluestone. You can’t miss us – we are right next to the iconic Storey Hall extension, which features bright green geometric-shaped windows and tiles.

Wrapping it up – Quiddity panel discussion

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Professor David Forrest (far left), Jon Buckingham and members of the of the Quiddity curatorium at the exhibition opening night. Photo: Vicki Jones Photography.

Our current exhibition Quiddity, (until 20 August) curated by RMIT Gallery in collaboration with interns from the RMIT Master of Arts Management course, gives students the opportunity to put the skills they have learned into practice and tests whether theory can stand up to the real-time practicalities of curation in a public art gallery.

On Thursday 18 August from 5.30-6.30 pm, join the Quiddity team along with guest speakers Professor David Forrest, HRD Coordinator, RMIT School of Art, and David Sequeira, a visual artist, art/business consultant and freelance museum education professional as they discuss the difference between the theory and reality when curating an exhibition, the challenges of using a permanent collection, and what they saw as the successes and failures of the exhibition.

Prospective students wanting to find out more about the RMIT Master of Arts (Art Management) program would also find the session useful. RMIT’s art, design and architecture students learn how to devise creative solutions to design problems by studying in simulated industry settings and working on real-world briefs and projects – such as Quiddity.

Taking its name from the Latin meaning ‘the essence of a thing’, Quiddity  explores the idea of thinking about artworks as physical objects rather than seeing them as items invested with meaning or expressing emotion. All works are selected from the RMIT Art Collection, with RMIT Collections Coordinator Jon Buckingham as lead curator on the exhibition.

Watch the exhibition video:

 

 

What: Wrapping It Up: Panel Discussion, with guest speakers Professor David Forrest and David Sequeira.

When: Thursday 18 August

Time: 5.30-6.30 pm

Where: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street, Melbourne.

Bookings: Free. Register here

Curator + Conservator in Conversation: RMIT Gallery talk 8 July

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Taking its name from the Latin meaning ‘the essence of a thing’, Quiddity (RMIT Gallery, 1 July – 20 August) seeks to unpack the RMIT Art Collection both literally and figuratively. The exhibition explores the idea of thinking about artworks as physical objects rather than seeing them as items invested with meaning or expressing emotion.

Join us on Thursday 7 July from 5.30-6.30 pm when exhibition curator Jon Buckingham and Danielle Measday, Conservator of Natural Sciences, Museum Victoria focus on the different ways the two disciplines approach permanent collections and the challenges of putting together an exhibition.

In Quiddity, works such 19th century Australian artist Hugh Ramsay’s nude (1895) will be displayed in its unrepaired state to highlight the process of conservation. The piece is one of the most notable in RMIT University’s Art Collection and it was damaged an transit with paint flaking off the surface. It is now stabilised and has been specially patched with Japanese paper.

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About the speakers

Jon Buckingham is the Collection Coordinator for RMIT University’s art collection. He is responsible for generating, researching and maintaining records on provenance, intellectual property and the history of RMIT’s artworks, and for their ongoing storage and conservation.  He facilitates the acquisition of new artworks for the University and project-manages the commissioning and installation of large scale artworks in public spaces. Jon also produces a variety of exhibitions and events from the collection, coordinates the display of works around campus, and organises loans to external institutions.

Danielle Measday is conservator of Natural Sciences for Museum Victoria. Her love of museum conservation began the first time she saw an X-Ray of a painting. She trained as an objects conservator at the University of Melbourne’s Masters of Cultural Material Conservation program. She works closely with collection managers, curators and researchers across the zoology, palaeontology and geology fields to find solutions to facilitate access to the collections, and preserve them for the future.

WHAT: Curator + Conservator in Conversation – Quiddity public program

WHEN: Thursday, 7 July 2016

TIME:  5:30 PM to 6:30 PM

WHERE: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street Melbourne

BOOKINGS: Free. Book tickets

Upcoming exhibitions: Quiddity & Light moves

Upcoming exhibitions at RMIT Gallery – Light moves: Contemporary Australian Video Art and Quiddity, a behind-the-scenes look at the RMIT Art Collection.

1 JULY – 20 AUGUST 2016
OPENING NIGHT | Thursday 30 JUNE, 6pm – 8pm   ALL WELCOME

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Quiddity

Quiddity (Latin meaning ‘the essence of a thing) unpacks the RMIT Art Collection, and features artists including: Stephen Benwell, Chris Bond, Peter Ellis, Helga Groves, Clare Humphries, Wanyubi Marika, Greg Moncrieff, Hisaharu Motoda, Nick Mourtzakis, Anthony Pryor, Klaus Rinke, Ah Xian, Ken & Julia Yonetani, and Paul Zika.

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Light moves: Contemporary Australian Video Art

Contemporary Australian artists present projected and screen-based works exploring the body and the possibilities of movement. Featuring Daniel Crooks, Hayden Fowler, Shaun Gladwell, Gabriella and Silvana Mangano, David Rosetzky, Julie Rrap and Christian Thompson. On tour from the National Gallery of Australia.

 

Vale Inge King: renowned sculptor & former RMIT lecturer

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Inge King, Bagatelle [1st version], 2004-11 Bronze 56 x 66 x 66 cm Purchased through the RMIT Art Fund, 2012 RMIT University Art Collection Accession no: RMIT.2013.9

Renowned Australian sculptor Inge King, whose monumental sculpture Forward Surge  on the lawn at the Arts Centre Melbourne is much-loved by locals and tourists, died peacefully on April 23, at the age of nearly 101.

While studying in London, the German-born artist met Australian printmaker and painter Grahame King and they returned to his hometown Melbourne in 1951, where they both spent much time teaching at RMIT. Inge taught sculpture at RMIT  from 1976 to 1987, and was awarded an honorary doctorate from RMIT in 1993. Grahame taught lithography at RMIT from 1966-88.

Two of Inge’s works are held in the RMIT Art Collection, which provides a considerable overview of Australian art history and includes some of the most highly regarded and successful artists that both the country and the University have produced. Its purpose is to tell the history of the University through the creative output of its staff and alumni, and to reflect RMIT’s core values of innovation, creativity, sustainability and social engagement.

King’s sculpture Daruma, purchased by RMIT in 1980, is featured in A Skilled Hand and a Cultivated Mind: A Guide to Architecture and Art of RMIT University. The authors note it “reveals King’s sophisticated approach to materials and understanding of abstract form.”

Along with Vincas Jomantas, Teisutis Zikaras and Lenton Parr, Inge King helped move Australian sculpture into the contemporary modernist milieu.She was part of the Centre 5 group whose mission it was to help foster greater public awareness in contemporary sculpture.

King’s work was seen recently in the 2014 RMIT Gallery exhibition Revelations: Sculpture from the RMIT Collection, curated by RMIT Collections Coordinator Jon Buckingham.Given that the majority of RMIT’s collection of sculpture comprises work spanning from the height of modernism in Australia to the present day, Revelations revealed a microcosm of practice and generational change during the last half-century.

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(Foreground) Inge King, Bagatelle [1st version], 2004-11 Bronze 56 x 66 x 66 cm, featured in Revelations: Sculpture from the RMIT Art Collection, RMIT Gallery, 2014. Photo: Mark Ashkanasy.

In his catalogue essay, Buckingham writes “the Centre 5 group – of whom Vincas Jomantas, Inge King, and Lenton Parr are represented in this exhibition – formed with the goal of establishing an entente between abstract sculpture and architecture. In doing so, they worked to popularise abstraction in a deeply conservative climate.

“While by no means the only abstract sculptors working in Australia at the time, the impact and originality of Centre 5 is impossible to deny…As teachers at RMIT their influence played an acute role in shaping the following generation.”

RMIT Gallery Director Suzanne Davies said that Inge King was a very lively contributor to a round table discussion during the curation of the 2003 exhibition Sculpture at RMIT During the Jomantas Years 1961-1987 (RMIT Gallery, 21 July – 13 September 2003).

“Inge was the voice of the highly respected senior artist at the gallery, and her insights were so important to the shape of the exhibition,” Ms Davies said.

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Inge King, Daruma, 1978 Steel and paint on aluminium 27 x 35 x 69 cm Purchased by the RMIT School of Art, 1980 RMIT University Art Collection Accession no: RMIT.1980.4

In her obituary of King, The Age Deputy Arts Editor Dewi Cooke noted that the sculptor “mastered the formalist language without becoming a formulaic formalist”.

“With her death, Australia has lost one of its most significant sculptors who created some of her finest pieces in the final few decades of her long and fruitful life,” Cooke wrote.

Moving & Storing the RMIT Art Collection

packed art works
RMIT Gallery is in transition! Building work commences next week as we begin essential work, including restoration of the airconditioner, and so staff have had to pack up and relocate to another RMIT University building until September 2015.
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That leaves works from the RMIT Art Collection not currently displayed around the campuses. These need to be carefully packed up and moved, itemised, logged and accounted for. It’s a far bigger job than staff wrapping their keyboards in plastic and ensuring their paperwork is placed in moving boxes.
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As well as its regular programming of exhibitions and events, RMIT Gallery also has responsibility for the RMIT Art Collection, which includes storage. RMIT Gallery Director Suzanne Davies is chair of the RMIT Art Committee, and RMIT Collections Coordinator Jon Buckingham and RMIT Gallery Registrar Peter Wilson have the day to day responsibility for looking after the collection. Mr Buckingham also oversees the digitisation of the entire collection as part of the large scale RMIT Art Collection Online project. 
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Here Mr Buckingham carefully wraps up William Dargie’s ‘Portrait of Sir John Storey’ (1952, oil on canvas) as it prepares for a ‘holiday’ in safe storage. See you in September, Sir Storey.
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A large part of the Art Collection is being stored at the RMIT Bundoora campus, but more space is needed, and as a city based university, space is at a premium. This is the exhibition space known as Gallery 6, which looks a little different from its recent incarnation when it held Terry Burrows exhibition Backs of Banaras. Here is Terry giving an artist talk (below) – an interesting contrast to the photo (above) where paintings are being wrapped for storage.
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With space is issue around the university, and works needing secure and climate controlled storage – the solution is to store extra artworks in external purpose built facilities.
IAS carrying work
The last two days of our move from RMIT Gallery’s premises at Storey Hall, 344 Swanston Street was overseen by International Art Services.
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IAS Storage Registrar Maria-Luisa said the artworks would be going to an IAS climate controlled storeroom.  “We’ve been listing, coding and packing around 150 two dimensional works,” she said. “The artwork will be stored on purpose built, elevated 2D racks in humidity and climate controlled rooms which are all dust proof.”
The move back will be equally time intensive, all the more so because it will come at a time when RMIT Gallery prepares to install its next exhibitions to celebrate the reopening of the building in September. Stay tuned!
Next exhibitions – September – October 2015

Power to the People!  18 September – 10 October

Spanish artist Julio Falagán’s work questions power and the established status quo through humour and irony, inviting audiences to become art collectors by taking home posters of the five original works made through the manipulation of popular prints bought in flea markets.

Artist statement:

“My work deals with the questioning of power and the established status quo through humour and irony. With a justified lack of respect for what or who doesnʼt deserve it, dignifying the trivial and obsolete as a starting point to reflect on social fracture, calling into question any dogmas.
 
A plea in favour of the small, the overlooked, the discarded, calling out the grandiloquences and the absolute truths.”

Performing Mobilities18 September – 24 October

Lucy Bleach, video still from 46a Middle Rd, part of the “Remote Viewing” project, shot by pigeon-mounted micro-camera, HD video, 2012-2015.

Lucy Bleach, video still from 46a Middle Rd, part of the “Remote Viewing” project, shot by pigeon-mounted micro-camera, HD video, 2012-2015.

Traces of creative journeys form expositions that explore and reimagine movement, place and event with local relevance and global resonance. explores how contemporary life in Australia, the world’s largest island continent, is framed by borders whilst constantly being reconstructed through dynamic processes of mobility.

This exhibition of new work curated by Mick Douglas seeks to creatively and critically explore forms, forces, dynamics, meanings and consequences of performing mobility through a program of new experimental work. This dynamic show will include mobile performances that depart from and return to RMIT Gallery.