Final days: Elizabeth Gower & Richard Bell exhibitions

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Richard Bell: Imagining Victory, installation image by Tobias Titz, RMIT Gallery, 2016.

Don’t miss the final days of the RMIT Gallery exhibitions – Elizabeth Gower: he loves me, he loves me not, Quiet Voices and Richard Bell: Imagining Victory.

Exhibitions end Saturday 23 April at 5 pm.

In his insightful review of Richard Bell’s Imagining Victory exhibition at RMIT Gallery, The Age art critic Robert Nelson writes “Bell is funny in a pessimistic way, with black humour if you like. He trades in caustic counterpoint rather than conciliatory gestures.”Read more

About the exhibitions

Richard Bell: Imagining Victory

Leading Australian artist Richard Bell’s trilogy of video projects digs beneath the veneer of cultural integration to expose how racism can be deeply embedded and passed on to future generations.

Quiet Voices

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Nirnay (Decision) the debut film of director Pushpa Rawat, is set on the outskirts of Delhi, and explores Pushpa’s life journey and that of her young, educated female friends. Quiet Voices installation image at RMIT Gallery by Tobias Titz, 2016.

These two works of art by Mithu Sen and Pushpa Rawat poetically address issues women face with obligation, patriarchy and the inter-generational dynamic.

Elizabeth Gower: he loves me, he loves me not

In the handwritten phrase ‘he loves me, he loves me not’ Elizabeth Gower poses the question 21,319 times symbolically representing a lifetime of re-evaluation and wavering, resilience and resolve in seeking approval from the generic male ‘he’.

In his review of  Gower’s powerful exhibition, The Age art critic Robert  Nelson writes “Gower’s critique of patriarchy emphasises both the embeddedness and the absurdity of love mixed with power.” Read more.

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Elizabeth Gower: he loves me, he loves me not. Photo: Tobias Titz, RMIT Gallery, 2016.

Opening night images: new exhibitions at RMIT Gallery

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(left to right) Elizabeth Gower and Leslie Cannold at the opening night of Gower’s exhibition ‘he loves me, he loves me not’ at RMIT Gallery.

Two new exhibitions at RMIT Gallery explore the ways women still feel culturally conditioned and socially obligated to seek male approval. Elizabeth Gower’s he loves me, he loves me not and Mithu Sen + Pushpa Rawat’s Quiet Voices were opened on Thursday 10 March by ethicist Dr Leslie Cannold and journalist and author Sushi Das.

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(left to right) RMIT Gallery director Suzanne Davies and journalist and author Sushi Das, who opened Mithu Sen + Pushpa Rawat’s exhibition Quiet Voices.

Dr Leslie Cannold said that the mere idea of Gower’s exhibition moved her so much and asked her to question why it is that women ask ‘does he loves me’ rather than ‘do I love myself?”

“Standing among the suspended panels, seeing the words repeated over and over again in the gallery space, I am even more moved by Gower’s work when I see it in the flesh,” Cannold said.

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Endless: Elizabeth Gower wrote the phrase ‘he loves me, he loves me not’ 21,319 times, painstakingly transcribed on 20 lengths of semi-transparent drafting film suspended from floor to ceiling in RMIT Gallery.

Sushi Das, The Age opinion editor, said Quiet Voices poetically address issues women in India face with obligation, patriarchy and the inter-generational dynamic. Das, author of the memoir Deranged Marriage said the works by Mithu Sen + Pushpa Rawat strongly address how women are conditioned to seek approval not only from their parents, but everyone, including their husband, bosses, even their children.

“We might not understand the language in these films, but instinctively relate to them and see within them the seed of women’s potential, no matter when that decision to break free from expectation finally comes, and for some, it isn’t until menopause or when they become grandmothers.”

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Pushpa Rawat’s film Nirnay (Decision) explores the journey of young, educated women on the outskirts of Delhi who feel powerlessly obligated when it comes to taking any major decision regarding their future.

On Thursday 7 April from 5.30-6.30, RMIT Gallery will be holding a free panel discussion on “seeking Approval: A question of power, gender or culture?”

Speakers Dr Elizabeth Gower (artist, educator), Dr Leslie Cannold (ethicist, researcher, author The Book of Rachael, What, No Baby? The Abortion Myth), Sushi Das (Opinion Editor, The Age, author Deranged Marriage) and Dr Meagan Tyler (RMIT Vice-Chancellor’s Research Fellow, editor Freedom Fallacy: The limits of liberal feminism) will explore women’s power struggles across different generations and cultures, including sexual violence and intimate partner violence, the need to please, and the ways the arts and the digital sphere provide an arena for women’s voices to be heard.

Free click here – bookings necessary

 

Exhibition openings 10 March 6-8 pm at RMIT Gallery

Reminder – please join us at three exhibition openings at RMIT Gallery tonight Thursday 10 March from 6-8 pm: Elizabeth Gower: ‘he loves me, he loves me not’, Mithu Sen + Pushpa Rawat: Quiet Voices, and Richard Bell: Imagining Victory. All welcome.

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Richard Bell | Imagining Victory 

Opening Night: Thursday 10 March | 6-8pm
Exhibition Dates: 11 March – 23 April

Opening Speaker | Professor Paul Gough, Pro Vice-Chancellor and Vice President, College of Design and Social Context, RMIT University Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor Academic and Vice-President, RMIT University

Drawing heavily upon the mechanisms of activism, this significant solo exhibition by leading Australian artist Richard Bell is centred on a trilogy of recent video projects that attempts to dig beneath the veneer of cultural integration to expose how racism can be deeply embedded and passed on to future generations. An Artspace exhibition toured by Museums & Galleries of NSW.

 

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Elizabeth Gower ‘he loves me, he loves me not’ . Installation image RMIT Gallery, 2016.

Elizabeth Gower | he loves me, he loves me not  

Opening Night: Thursday 10 March | 6-8pm
Exhibition Dates: 11 March – 23 April

Opening Speaker | Dr Leslie Cannold, Ethicist, researcher, author 

Women in all cultures are encouraged to seek validation at an early age, by conforming to prescribed behaviours, sanctioned body image, fashion, career and lifestyle choices. In the handwritten phrase he loves me, he loves me not RMIT Alumnus Elizabeth Gower poses the question 21,319 times symbolically representing a lifetime of re-evaluation and wavering, resilience and resolve.

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Image (screen detail) Mithu Sen I have only one language; it is not mine, 2014, 42 min. Video installation based on a performance. Installation image at RMIT Gallery, 2016.

Mithu Sen and Pushpa Rawat | Quiet Voices

Opening Night: Thursday 10 March | 6-8pm
Exhibition Dates: 11 March – 23 April

Opening Speaker | Ms Sushi Das, Opinion Editor, The Age, author 

The works by Mithu Sen and Pushpa Rawat poetically address issues women face with obligation,
patriarchy and the inter-generational dynamic.For her multi-media installation I have only one language; it is not mine renowned Delhi-based artist Mithu Sen spent a month at a Kerala orphanage to experience firsthand what life was like for these marginalised young girls. Nirnay (Decision) the debut film of director Pushpa Rawat explores Pushpa’s journey and that of her young, educated women friends on the outskirts of Delhi who feel powerlessly obligated when it comes to taking any major decision regarding their future.

 

 

Happy International Women’s Day

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Elizabeth Gower’s exhibition at RMIT Gallery ‘he loves me, he loves me not’ (11 March – 23 April)

Happy International Women’s Day 2016! With the #IWD 2016 campaign theme #PledgeForParity calling for ways to collectively help women achieve advancement and leadership, please join us at two new exhibitions that open this week at RMIT Gallery – exploring how women are culturally conditioned to seek approval.

On Thursday 10 March 6-8 pm, Elizabeth Gower’s ‘he loves me, he loves me not’ will be opened by ethicist and author Dr Leslie Cannold, and Mithu Sen + Pushpa Rawta’s Quiet Voices will also be launched by journalist and author Sushi Das.

In the handwritten phrase he loves me, he loves me not Elizabeth Gower poses the question 21,319 times symbolically representing a lifetime of re-evaluation and wavering, resilience and resolve.
In Quiet Voices,internationally acclaimed artist Mithu Sen and emerging film maker Pushpa Rawat poetically address issues women face with obligation, patriarchy and the inter-generational dynamic.

All welcome – please join us in celebration of hearing women’s voices.

March exhibitions opening at RMIT Gallery

Please join us Thursday 10 March 6-8 pm to celebrate the opening of three exhibitions by leading Australian artists Richard Bell and Elizabeth Gower, internationally acclaimed artist Mithu Sen and emerging film maker Pushpa Rawat.

Richard Bell | Imagining Victory 

Opening Night: Thursday 10 March | 6-8pm  – All welcome
Exhibition Dates: 11 March – 23 April

Opening Speaker | Professor Paul Gough, Pro Vice-Chancellor and Vice President, College of Design and Social Context, RMIT University Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor Academic and Vice-President, RMIT University

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About the exhibition
Curator: Alexie Glass-Kantor | Artist: Richard Bell
Drawing heavily upon the mechanisms of activism, this significant solo exhibition by leading Australian artist Richard Bell is centred on a trilogy of recent video projects that attempts to dig beneath the veneer of cultural integration to expose how racism can be deeply embedded and passed on to future generations.
An Artspace exhibition toured by Museums & Galleries of NSW.

Richard Bell has just been announced as the recipient of a prestigious Australia Council Visual Arts Award.

The 2016 Australia Council awards honour eight distinguished Australian artists who have made an exceptional contribution to the arts over many years.   These prestigious national awards combine long-standing lifetime and outstanding achievement awards in music, literature, community arts and cultural development, visual arts, theatre, dance, and emerging and experimental arts.

Now in its second year, the Australia Council Awards ceremony will be held in Sydney on Thursday, 10 March, so unfortunately Richard Bell will be unable to attend the RMIT Gallery opening of his exhibition.

Richard Bell has held a number of solo exhibitions since 1990 and works across a variety of media, including painting, installation, performance and video. His work explores the complex artistic and political problems of Western, colonial and Indigenous art production. He is represented in major collections in Australia and New Zealand and has had significant solo exhibitions internationally, including at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam this year. His work Embassy will feature in the 20th Biennale of Sydney in March. He received the Telstra National Aboriginal Art Award in 2003. Richard is part of the Proppa Now Collective in Brisbane, which mentors young Indigenous artists.

RMIT Gallery Elizabeth Gower evite

Elizabeth Gower | he loves me, he loves me not  

Elizabeth Gower | he loves me, he loves me not  
Opening Night: Thursday 10 March | 6-8pm   – All welcome
Exhibition Dates: 11 March – 23 April
Opening SpeakerDr Leslie Cannold Ethicist, researcher, author
About the exhibition

Curator: Suzanne Davies | Artist: Elizabeth Gower

Women in all cultures are encouraged to seek validation at an early age, by conforming to prescribed behaviours, sanctioned body image, fashion, career and lifestyle choices. In the handwritten phrase he loves me, he loves me not RMIT Alumnus Elizabeth Gower poses the question 21,319 times symbolically representing a lifetime of re-evaluation and wavering, resilience and resolve.

 

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Mithu Sen and Pushpa Rawat | Quiet Voices

Opening Night: Thursday 10 March | 6-8pm  – All welcome
Exhibition Dates: 11 March – 23 April

Opening Speaker | Ms Sushi Das Opinion Editor, The Age, author

The works by Mithu Sen and Pushpa Rawat poetically address issues women face with obligation,patriarchy and the inter-generational dynamic.

For her multi-media installation I have only one language; it is not mine renowned Delhi-based artist Mithu Sen spent time at a Kerala orphanage to experience firsthand what life was like for these marginalised young girls. Nirnay (Decision) the debut film of director Pushpa Rawat explores Pushpa’s journey and that of her young, educated women friends on the outskirts of Delhi who feel powerlessly obligated when it comes to taking any major decision regarding their future.