Artists talk about Experiment Recharge

On Wednesday 11 March, from 5.30-6.30 pm, Experimenta Recharge: 6th International Biennial of Media Art,  artists will gather at RMIT Gallery for an informal after work artist’s talk.

Cake Industries, (Dean Petersen and Jesse Stevens), Stuart McFarlane and Darrin Verhagen (with Toby Brodel), and Leisa Shelton will speak about their work in the exhibition. Please join us for this fascinating insight into the exhibition and artistic practice.

Experimenta Recharge ends on Saturday 21 February at White Night Melbourne. RMIT Gallery will be open from 7 pm to 7 am and we welcome everyone to come in and play with the works!

 

Cake Industries, Simulacrum 2014 3D printed portraits, frame, LED lights, motors 92 x 130 x 25 cm

Cake Industries, Simulacrum 2014
3D printed portraits, frame, LED lights, motors
92 x 130 x 25 cm

Cake Industries 

Dean Petersen and Jesse Stevens have worked under the collaborative pseudonym of Cake Industries since 2006. Their practice uses electro-mechanics and robotics to create anthropomorphic and autonomous objects that embrace retro-futurism.

Cake Industries’ Simulacrum reinstates the sense of occasion and significance of ageold
processes of portraiture that have become disposable in the digital world. The
artists invited 15 members of their community in Melbourne to have their portrait
taken using 3D scanning and printing technology, a process that involves careful and
time-consuming preparations by both the subjects and artists to ensure a successful
outcome.

Cake Industries, Simulacrum 2014 3D printed portraits, frame, LED lights, motors 92 x 130 x 25 cm

Cake Industries, Simulacrum 2014
3D printed portraits, frame, LED lights, motors
92 x 130 x 25 cm

In homage to the forgotten subjects of 19th century daguerreotype photographs, the
artists have chosen not to identify their subjects by name but by archetypes, including:
The Neighbour, The Mechanic, The Performer, The Illustrator, The Explorer, The Artist,
The Melbournian, The Cultural Ambassador, The Student, The Salesman, The
Costumier, The Designer, The Master Craftsman, The Music Agent and The Activist.

A series of small wire objects (many of them uninteresting): Object 2 2014 dimensions variable sound, light, code, plinth, black-out curtains, AkE (Audiokinetic Experiments) Lab RMIT, (((20Hz)))

A series of small wire objects (many of them uninteresting): Object 2
2014
dimensions variable
sound, light, code, plinth, black-out curtains,
AkE (Audiokinetic Experiments) Lab RMIT, (((20Hz)))

STUART MCFARLANE & DARRIN VERHAGEN with TOBY BRODEL

Stuart McFarlane and Darrin Verhagen explore how the simplest of objects may be transformed into something startling and mesmerising through the use of technology.

Verhagen and McFarlane are Melbourne based artists working across a variety of art and design disciplines. Their collaborative works emphasise emotion in relation to light, motion and narrative.

A series of small wire objects (many of them uninteresting): Object 2 2014 dimensions variable sound, light, code, plinth, black-out curtains, AkE (Audiokinetic Experiments) Lab RMIT, (((20Hz)))

A series of small wire objects (many of them uninteresting): Object 2
2014
dimensions variable
sound, light, code, plinth, black-out curtains,
AkE (Audiokinetic Experiments) Lab RMIT, (((20Hz)))

A series of small wire objects (many of them uninteresting) is concerned with
extending sound art composition into visual form through the use of an ordinary
sculptural object as a means of focusing audience attention. The artists explore how
the simplest of objects may be transformed into something startling and mesmerising
through the simultaneous use of sound, light and colour.

In this work, an open-source platform created by Stuart McFarlane and Darrin
Verhagen has been pushed to its limits through collaboration with audiovisual artist
and programmer, Toby Brodel. This second iteration of the work, ‘Object 2’, was
inspired by the sensory immersion of Panos Cosmato’s cult film Beyond the Black
Rainbow (2010).

LEISA SHELTON

LEISA SHELTON, (centre) meets with audiences in this participatory project at Experimenta Recharge

LEISA SHELTON, (centre) meets with audiences in this participatory project at Experimenta Recharge.

In Mapping Australian Media Art, Leisa Shelton has responded to a perceived lack of
knowledge about the history of media art in Australia. In this participatory project,
Shelton will sit at a table in the gallery inviting individuals to join her in a conversation
about significant encounters they have had with media art in Australia – to name the
artists that have made an impression on them and marked us as a culture.

Leisa Shelton, Mapping Australian Media Art 2014–16 performance, desk, chairs, archive cards, rubber stamps, stainless steel archive boxes, custom built plinth 90cm x 236cm x 38cm

Leisa Shelton, Mapping Australian Media Art 2014–16
performance, desk, chairs, archive cards, rubber stamps, stainless steel
archive boxes, custom built plinth
90cm x 236cm x 38cm

Notes from each conversation will be documented on an individual archive card, stamped
and signed, and placed in a handcrafted archive box. Individual cards will never be
displayed and will only ever be accessed by the artist. This process will be repeated at
each venue as Experimenta Recharge tours Australia during 2015–16, building a
serendipitous history of media art across Australia.

Leisa Shelton, Mapping Australian Media Art 2014–16 performance, desk, chairs, archive cards, rubber stamps, stainless steel archive boxes, custom built plinth 90cm x 236cm x 38cm

Leisa Shelton, Mapping Australian Media Art 2014–16
performance, desk, chairs, archive cards, rubber stamps, stainless steel
archive boxes, custom built plinth
90cm x 236cm x 38cm

While Mapping Australian Media Art honours the handmade and the individual, it
shifts significance beyond the tangible material produced, marking conversations,
collective remembering and the sharing of information as vital, conceptually rich
outcomes.

 

Leisa Shelton, Mapping Australian Media Art 2014–16 performance, desk, chairs, archive cards, rubber stamps, stainless steel archive boxes, custom built plinth 90cm x 236cm x 38cm

Leisa Shelton, Mapping Australian Media Art 2014–16
performance, desk, chairs, archive cards, rubber stamps, stainless steel
archive boxes, custom built plinth
90cm x 236cm x 38cm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy New Year! RMIT Gallery has reopened for 2015 with Experimenta Recharge

visitor comments

 

RMIT Gallery has reopened after the Christmas break and is filled with relaxed tourists and locals enjoying the city sights. Our visitor book is brimming with lovely comments about our summer media exhibition Experimenta Recharge 6th International Biennial of Media Art. If you are in Melbourne, come on in – we are open every day except Sunday and until 7 pm on Wednesday nights – so come in a play around with the exhibits.

Experimenta-2014-156

What the media are saying:

 

 

 

After the Big Bang – Korinsky’s sound installation in Experimenta Recharge

 

Abel Korinsky with his work Korinsky Collective: RL2000 2014 sound and mixed media installation dimensions variable. Photo Evelyn Tsitas, RMIT Gallery, 2014

Abel Korinsky with his work  RL2000 2014
sound and mixed media installation
dimensions variable. Photo Evelyn Tsitas, RMIT Gallery, 2014

We are all fascinated by artistic practice and the ‘working out’ of process that offers us a ‘behind the scenes’ glimpse of how creative work is developed. But what of the finished product?

German sound artist Abel Korinsky, who is in Melbourne on a two month residency with Experimenta and RMIT, gave audiences an insight into his process when he joined theoretical astrophysicist Dr Katie Mack and RMIT’s Lawrence Harvey, Associate Professor and Director of SIAL Sound Studios, on 29 October, 2014 at RMIT Gallery to talk about space – art – and Big Bang Sounds.

Missed the talk? Catch up with the podcast and blog – click here.

You can now see Abel Korinsky’s finished artwork using the ideas of the resonance of Big Bang sounds as inspiration for RL2000, by visiting the exhibition Experimenta Recharge: 6th International Biennial of Media Art at RMIT Gallery until 21 February.

Korinsky’s artwork RL2000 2014,sound and mixed media installation, picks up on the ideas he discussed in the Melbourne Knowledge Week talk available on podcast, and asks audiences to imagine that sound never fully disappears and is present in our universe forever. What would it sound like to hear all the sounds of the past and present? How would it change our perceptions of time and death?

Korinsky Collective: RL2000 2014 sound and mixed media installation dimenions variable. Photo Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2014

Korinsky Collective: RL2000 2014
sound and mixed media installation
dimensions variable. Photo Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2014

As part of the sound artist collective Korinsky (together with his twin brother Carlo, and younger brother Max) Abel presents the sound piece in an immersive installation inspired by the recent announcement by researchers at the Harvard-Smithsonian Centre that they had documented sound waves from the Big Bang soon after the birth of our universe. In a room in RMIT Gallery where the work is exhibited, when the lights go off intermittently the audience is plunged into darkness which quickly fills with fluorescent glow of paint on the spider-like central pod that is reminiscent perhaps of a 1950s Sci Fi movie set design. 

Korinsky Collective: RL2000 2014 sound and mixed media installation dimenions variable. Photo Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2014

Korinsky Collective: RL2000 2014
sound and mixed media installation
dimensions variable. Photo Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2014

The artists invite audiences to imagine the implications of hearing sounds from the past and to place themselves in a situation where perceptions of time, space and place might be disrupted.

Korinsky’s work has been developed during a residency with Experimenta as part of the EMARE AUS
CDN Move On Exchange (European media artists in residence in exchange with Australia and
Canada). This program is supported by the Culture 2013 Programme of the European Commission.

Come and play at Experimenta Recharge: now open at RMIT Gallery

Paranoia, 2010, reactive sculpture 15 x 11 x 20 cm by Anaisa Franco. Photo by Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

Paranoia, 2010,
reactive sculpture
15 x 11 x 20 cm by Anaisa Franco. Photo by Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

Today at RMIT Gallery something has been screaming non stop – it’s Anaisa Franco reactive sculpture “Paranoia” and the Experimenta Recharge audience are delighting in standing close and watching (and hearing) those false teeth scream!

The screaming (and laughing) teeth are part of the Brazilian artist’s Psychosomatic series: Paranoia (2010), Frustration (2012), and Emanating Happiness (2014); reactive sculptures that create an endless loop of emotional responses between her artworks and audience.

Inspired by psychology, dreams and the possibilities inherent in DIY electrical engineering, Anaisa animates objects with behaviours and feelings to blur the boundaries between body, mind and machine. Each electronic sculpture embodies a particular emotion and highlights the potential of the digital to reconnect us with latent human emotions and the potential uses of digital interfaces.

‘Paranoia’ is one of three of Anaisa’s artworks on display at the 6th International Biennial of Media Art at RMIT Gallery until 21 February 2015…and yes, it screams.

Artist Ei Wada plays with Anaisa Franco's sensitive sculpture  'Frustration' at Experimenta Recharge.

Artist Ei Wada plays with Anaisa Franco’s sensitive sculpture ‘Frustration’ at Experimenta Recharge. Photo by Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

A little more quiet is Frustration 2012, a sensitive sculpture. Anaisa, who was born in Sao Paulo, Brazil and lives Berlin, Germany, works with robotics and low-fi electronics to produce interactive sculptures and installation that connect mechanical processes with the subconscious human mind. At the Experimenta Recharge opening weekend arts seminar, Anaisa talked about the role of the body as a holder of knowledge and memory in her work. With a mother who is a psychologist, Anaisa said she naturally gravitated to the ideas arising from psychology for inspiration in her artwork.

Anaisa Franco's Emanating Happiness 2014, interactive sculpture, wood, LED neon flex. Image: Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

Anaisa Franco’s Emanating Happiness 2014, interactive sculpture, wood, LED neon flex. Image: Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

Anaisa’s work Emanating Happiness, 2014 is an interactive sculpture that generates an exuberant and colorful light wave when people walk on it. The work is part of Psychosomatic Series.

It has been developed during an artist in residence program at Creative and Cognition Studios, University of Technology, Sydney, November, 2014, as part of the EMARE AUS CDN Move On Exchange (European media artists in residence in exchange with Australia and Canada). This program is supported by the Culture 2013 Programme of the European Commission and the Goethe Institute.

Anaisa has a Master in Digital Art and Technology at University of Plymouth in England and graduated in Visual Arts at FAAP in Sao Paulo. She has been exhibiting internationally around the world.

Anaisa Franco's Emanating Happiness 2014, interactive sculpture, wood, LED neon flex. Image: Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

Anaisa Franco’s Emanating Happiness 2014, interactive sculpture, wood, LED neon flex. Image: Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

A decade ago, Anaisa revealed to an art magazine her dream of one day creating a biological
species of robots. “The central idea would be to produce beings that were self-programmed, self-developed, self-reproducing, beings that lack patterns and rules to control them. I would…build an alive house, where all inanimate things would be alive and genetically modified. In this new world new forms of life could evolve.” With her interactive sculptures at Experimenta Recharge, it is possible to see how the artist has pursued an aspect of that dream.

Exhibition: Experimenta Recharge: 6th International Biennial of Media Art

Artist: Anaisa Franco

Works: Psychosomatic series: Paranoia (2010), Frustration (2012), and Emanating Happiness (2014)

Venue: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street, Melbourne.

Dates: Now showing until 21 February 2015

Sounds Like Deep Space – Big Bang Sounds podcast is live

Sounds Like Deep Space...(left to right) Dr Katie Mack, Abel Korinsky and Lawrence Harvey

(left to right) Dr Katie Mack, Abel Korinsky and Lawrence Harvey

Time, space, distance – who isn’t fascinated by what’s up in the stars and beyond?  Artists have been gazing to the heavens since they picked up something to draw with and record what they saw with their eyes and imaginations. So it is no surprise then that in 2014, an experimental artist has turned to the cosmos for inspiration.

Working with multichannel sound installations, artist German artist Abel Korinsky questions what could happen if sounds from the past could be reconstructed and heard. What would the Big Bang sound like? A new work by Korinsky is included in the upcoming Experimenta Recharge 6th International Biennial of Media Art exhibition held at RMIT Gallery from 28 November 2014 to 21 February 2015.

As a preview of things to come, he joined theoretical astrophysicist Dr Katie Mack and RMIT’s Lawrence Harvey, Associate Professor and Director of SIAL Sound Studios, on 29 October, 2014 at RMIT Gallery to talk about space – art – and Big Bang Sounds.

Missed it? Listen to the podcast here:

As Lawrence Harvey pondered, why does the notion of the Big Bang hold such a fascination for people? It was a full house for the talk, with artists, scientists, and those simply fascinated by the concepts listening to the trio talk. Dr Sarah Jane Pell, an artist exploring the Aesthetics & Technics of Human Performance Exploration, grabbed a front row seat and questioned Abel Korinsky about placing himself in unusual environments to create his work and find inspiration for sound art and performance.

Artist Sarah Jane Pell and Abel Korinsky

Artist Sarah Jane Pell and Abel Korinsky

IMG_5601The audience sat enthralled, surrounded for the talk by the spectacular artwork from Balgo in the exhibition Warlayirti: The Art of Balgo. The exhibition has now come down to make way for Experimenta Recharge, which opens on 28 November – but Warlayirti: The Art of Balgo can be seen in the NT, at the Araluen Arts Centre (28 November – 15 February 2015).

IMG_5592

IMG_5597Katie Mack (@AstroKatie) suggested people are fascinated by space – and the Big Bang – because everyone wants to know where we came from and has a curiosity about the beginning and the end and what it would have been like at the beginning of time. Dr Mack is a theoretical astrophysicist. Throughout her career as a researcher at Caltech, Princeton, Cambridge, and now Melbourne University, she has studied dark matter, black holes, cosmic strings, and the formation of the first galaxies in the Universe.

IMG_5608

“I can think of time as distance – the concept of now is tricky. I can’t observe now anywhere else – if you are moving quickly time passes differently. Time and space are linked together.

“Time passes and things end but everything follows on from everything else. If we were on a planet 65 million light years ago and we had a powerful enough telescope we could see the dinosaurs on earth.”

IMG_5609

Interestingly, Kate spoke about how she uses art when thinking about time and space, referencing works such as Salvador Dalí’s The Persistence of Memory. The works from Balgo were another example of how the resonance of sound and ideas of time and space might be imagined, she said.

Warlayirti: The Art of Balgo  at RMIT Gallery, 16 September – Saturday 8 November, 2014. Photo: Mark Ashkanasy, 2014.

Warlayirti: The Art of Balgo at RMIT Gallery, 16 September – Saturday 8 November, 2014. Photo: Mark Ashkanasy, 2014.

The audience then heard a snippet of Abel Korinsky’s big bang sounds…..

The Big Bang Sounds talk release on podcast is timely indeed with the successful landing of a robotic spacecraft on a comet for the first time in history. Rosetta mission’s safe landing on gives scientists their first chance to ride a comet and study close up what happens as it gets closer to the sun.

Both scientists and artists reach for the stars when they launch ambitious projects. Their ambitions and fearlessness are about the challenge of being bold and not being afraid. The success of the Big Bang Sounds talk is a small step in this direction – the Rosetta Mission a cosmic and large one – and ventures are mirrored in the bold, ambitious new media works that will be on show at the  Experimenta Recharge 6th International Biennial of Media Art exhibition held at RMIT Gallery from 28 November 2014 to 21 February 2015.