RMIT Gallery Christmas & summer opening times

RMIT Gallery will be closed from Saturday 24 December to Monday 2 January 2017, reopening on Tuesday 3 January. 

Are you in the city over summer? Come into our air conditioned gallery right in the centre of the cultural district and enjoy our interactive summer exhibition – Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts (until 18 February  2017).

Have a play with (((20))) VIM\SIMS which explores visually and sonically induced motion sickness (pictured above). Place your hand in the well of the plinth and watch shadows dance to the sound.The experience is in turns dissociative and enveloping – and potentially nauseating. This is serious academic discourse as popular entertainment; physical discomfort as fine art.

For those who prefer gentler interactive experiences, explore the work of Andrea Rassell. We are silently surveilling one another is a microscopically mediated installation that puts the human organism on the slide and offers up a perspective of that humanity as a crawling seething mass.

In his review on the exhibition for The Article, Sam Leach commented “The works provide scope for a poetic and elliptical understanding of the interactions between humans and non-humans and the ideas of connection and contamination.”

Don’t forget – RMIT Gallery is open until 7 pm every Thursday night, and from 12 noon to 5 pm every Saturday during exhibitions.

Merry Christmas from RMIT Gallery and thank you for your support in 2016. We look forward to seeing you in the New Year with more compelling exhibitions in 2017.

 

 

A corrupting metaphor? Artists ponder disease & the arts – Thursday 8 December talk at RMIT Gallery

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Lienors Torre, Cabinet of Ocular Obscurities, referencing the grotesque sideshow or museum displays of biological abnormalities. Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts installation image by Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2016.

Join  us on Thursday 8 December from 5.30-6.30pm  at RMIT Gallery when Sean Redmond co-curator of Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts discusses science, the arts and disease with Alison Bennett, Drew Berry, and Lienors Torre. And there will be poetry as well as pondering.

In his review on the exhibition for The Article, Sam Leach commented “The works provide scope for a poetic and elliptical understanding of the interactions between humans and non-humans and the ideas of connection and contamination.”

Speakers:

Lienors Torre’s multi-media and glass work on degenerative vision explores how our view of the world is metered and tainted by digital technologies. Consisting of a large glass eyeball, Ipad and augmented application, and a glass cabinet full of glass jars filled with water in varying degrees of opacity and with engraved eye images on them, eyes quickly become raindrops, as the liquidity of vision is brought to watery life. There are tears and scars that reflect across the eyes of this exquisite art-piece.

Alison Bennett’s touch-based screen work presents the viewer with a high-resolution scan of bruised skin. Invited to touch the soft and damaged tissue before them, their eyes become organs of touch, and their fingers work as sensory digits that feel as they move over what becomes a damaged but delicate bio-art surface.

In Drew Berry’s work, infectious cells are set free onto walls so that the very connective tissue of the exhibition room teems with the droplets of life and death. Herpes, influenza, HIV, polio and smallpox bacteria take flight, are magnified, so that those entering the space are hit by scale and size, and take part in this chorea of the senses.

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Invasion of the Ants (2016), three screen installation by Joshua Redmond and Sean Redmond, Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts. Installation image by Mark Ashkanasy, 2016, RMIT Gallery.

In Sean and Josh Redmond’s three-screen video installation, ants become a different type of political disease. Combining found and actuality footage, the work uses the metaphors of ant invasion to re-envision the current refugee crisis and the way stateless people are made to be matter-out-of place. The central image of the piece, a flimsy toy dinghy floating on the salty water, recalls Australia’s turn back the boat policy, and the haunting truth that it is children who are made to suffer most. This is a disease of political undertaking.

What: Morbis Artis – panel discussion with Sean Redmond, Alison Bennett, Drew Berry and Lienors Torre.

When: Thursday 8 December 5.30-6.30 pm

Where: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street, Melbourne.

 Freeplease register.

Touch me: Alison Bennett speaks about ‘expanded photography’ on 6 December 1-2 pm

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Bruise, 2015, by Alison Bennett. Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts Installation image by Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2016.

Artist Alison Bennett works in ‘expanded photography’ where the boundaries of photography have shifted in the transition to digital media and become diffused into ubiquitous computing.

Her work has generated international viral media attention more than once and features in the current RMIT Gallery exhibition Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts at RMIT Gallery (17 November – 18 February 2016)an interactive bio-art exhibition that uses actual and metaphoric communicative diseases to explore the fractured relationship between human and non-human life.

Alison Bennett will be speaking about her work and ‘expanded photography’ at RMIT Gallery on Tuesday 6 December from 1-2 pm.

Her interactive piece Bruise is a touch-based screen work that presents the viewer with a high-resolution scan of bruised skin. Invited to touch the soft and damaged tissue before them, their eyes become organs of touch, and their fingers work as sensory digits that feel as they move over what becomes a damaged but delicate bio-art surface.

Bennett’s recent projects explored the creative potentials of augmented reality, stereophotogrammetry, 3D scanning, and virtual reality as encompassed by the medium and practice of photography.

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Artist Alison Bennett with her interactive work Bruise at RMIT Gallery.

As a neuroqueer trans-media artist, Bennett’s work has explored the performance and technology of gender identity and considered the convergence of biological and digital skin as virtual prosthesis.

What: Alison Bennett artist talk on ‘expanded photography’

When: Tuesday 6 December, 1-2 pm

Where: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street, Melbourne.

Bookings: register

Artist talk: Jodi Sita: the creative relationship between art and science practice

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Seeing the future: Jodi Sita’s image of her own eye revealed the early stages of glaucoma, a largely an invisible eye disease.

Jodi Sita is an academic and researcher in the areas of neuroscience and anatomy, and with a leading interest in the creative relationship between art and science practice.

She will be speaking about her work in Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts at RMIT Gallery, along with Alison Bennett on Tuesday 6 December 1-2 pm at RMIT Gallery.

Jodi’s fascination for understanding how anatomical systems work and her strong visual tendencies have seen her research, teach and create artwork around the ecology of the human body.

“The Macular collection shows one normal and four degenerated eyeballs allowing us to glimpse the heinous beauty of this pathological and debilitating condition,” Jodi said.

“The Retina collection allows a look into the dark spaces of the eye…and My Eye are images of my own eye, showing a normal healthy eyeball structure – except for an image (pictured above) in which it was discovered I was in the early stages of glaucoma.

“In the Pupils collection (below), the colours and palates of the iris have been enhanced to create images that evoke landscapes, lightning strikes, planets and flowers – all scenes we scan with our irises. Hidden only to vision scientists and specialists, are the amazing landscapes found at the back of the eyeball; the retina, the macular and the fovea.”

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Jodi Sita with her work in Morbis Artis: the colours and palates of the iris have been enhanced to create images that evoke landscapes, lightning strikes, planets and flowers.

Jodi Sita is currently editing an anthology on Eye Tracking The Moving Image with Bloomsbury Press.

What: Jodi Sita artist talk on the creative relationship between art and science practice

When: Tuesday 6 December, 1-2 pm

Where: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street, Melbourne.

Bookings: register

Artists discuss ‘diseases of the arts’ at RMIT Gallery

RMIT Gallery 2016 Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts Date: 17 NOV 2016 - 18 FEB 2017 Location: RMIT Gallery, City campus Morbis Artis explores the radical conjunction between the biomolecular and the artistic, and the thin doorway between life and death housed within discourses of disease.

Photo by Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery 2016

Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts at RMIT Gallery (17 November – 18 February 2016) is an interactive bio-art exhibition that uses actual and metaphoric communicative diseases to explore the fractured relationship between human and non-human life.

Join us at RMIT Gallery on Thursday 1 December from 5.30 – 6.30 pm as Cameron Bishop, Chris Henschke, Harry Nankin, Darrin Verhagen and Anne Scott Wilson discuss translating metaphor into art and their work in Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts. 

RMIT Gallery 2016 Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts Date: 17 NOV 2016 - 18 FEB 2017 Location: RMIT Gallery, City campus Morbis Artis explores the radical conjunction between the biomolecular and the artistic, and the thin doorway between life and death housed within discourses of disease.

The Zero Machine (or The Human Stain Remover), Cameron Bishop & Simon Reis. 
 Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts, RMIT Gallery installation image by Mark Ashkanasy, 2016.

Cameron Bishop’s mechanical installation seeks to rid the art world of all diseased art. This playful machine aesthetic re-mediates art ‘masterpieces’ as they are pressed and turned through the machine, coming out cleaned of all impressionable colour, line and shape. The blank surface we are left with is the ultimate neo-liberal art piece – instantly copyable and immediately forgettable.

RMIT Gallery 2016 Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts Date: 17 NOV 2016 - 18 FEB 2017 Location: RMIT Gallery, City campus Morbis Artis explores the radical conjunction between the biomolecular and the artistic, and the thin doorway between life and death housed within discourses of disease.

Song of the Phenomena, 2016, by Chris Henschke. Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts. RMIT Gallery installation image by Mark Ashkanasy, 2016.

Chris Henschke’s work explores anti-matter as we bare witness to how radiation is released by organic matter. Using an actual particle accelerator, the work shows how the humble bananaemits antimatter on a regular basis. In an age where we fear the way antimatter impacts upon the nature of everyday life and the workings of the cosmos, we see how the organic itself brings potential dissolution to the human world.

RMIT Gallery 2016 Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts Date: 17 NOV 2016 - 18 FEB 2017 Location: RMIT Gallery, City campus Morbis Artis explores the radical conjunction between the biomolecular and the artistic, and the thin doorway between life and death housed within discourses of disease.

Syzygy (2007-16) by Harry Nankin
Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts, RMIT Gallery installation image by Mark Ashkanasy, 2016

In Harry Nankin’s nine, multi-panel palimpsests displayed on light boxes, lake becomes semi-arid land as the impact of the contemporary ecological crisis finds its root and branch in starlight and shadowgram as live invertebrates mourn the age of the anthropocene. The work ‘photo-poetically’ memorializes this erasure, resurrecting the dry lakebed into a focal plane upon which primal starlight is used to imprint photographic films on moonless nights. The environmental disease at the heart of this work is human-made: as we lay waste to our planet, the stars are slowly going out.

RMIT Gallery 2016 Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts Date: 17 NOV 2016 - 18 FEB 2017 Location: RMIT Gallery, City campus Morbis Artis explores the radical conjunction between the biomolecular and the artistic, and the thin doorway between life and death housed within discourses of disease.

blue/red:VIM/SIMS (2016) 
Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts, RMIT Gallery installation image by Mark Ashkanasy 2016

In Darrin Verhagen’s work with the group (((20hz))) sound-image installation explores the way audio-visual fields can wildly affect the well-being of the hearing-viewer. With two catastrophic audio-vision soundtracks that register as sickly encounters, one can choose to hear without commentary, or to hear about how and why the soundscape induces nausea. Pulsating light beams and reflections accompany these sound pieces like a cosmos is dying and exploding before us.

RMIT Gallery 2016 Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts Date: 17 NOV 2016 - 18 FEB 2017 Location: RMIT Gallery, City campus Morbis Artis explores the radical conjunction between the biomolecular and the artistic, and the thin doorway between life and death housed within discourses of disease.

Fluid retention, 2016 
Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts, RMIT Gallery installation image by Mark Ashkanasy, 2016

Anne Scott Wilson’s balloon installation and video projection explores the poetics of gravity and the chrononormativity of time to account and prepare us for the not-living that eventually befalls us all. The stillness of the balloon and the movement of the ballet dancer speak to the material divide between the body that lives, that dies, and that then, perhaps, floats away.

What: Panel discussion artist talk with Cameron Bishop, Chris Henschke, Harry Nankin, Darrin Verhagen and Anne Scott Wilson

When: Thursday 1 December 5.30-6.30 pm

Where: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street Melbourne

Bookings: free – please register