After the Big Bang – Korinsky’s sound installation in Experimenta Recharge

 

Abel Korinsky with his work Korinsky Collective: RL2000 2014 sound and mixed media installation dimensions variable. Photo Evelyn Tsitas, RMIT Gallery, 2014

Abel Korinsky with his work  RL2000 2014
sound and mixed media installation
dimensions variable. Photo Evelyn Tsitas, RMIT Gallery, 2014

We are all fascinated by artistic practice and the ‘working out’ of process that offers us a ‘behind the scenes’ glimpse of how creative work is developed. But what of the finished product?

German sound artist Abel Korinsky, who is in Melbourne on a two month residency with Experimenta and RMIT, gave audiences an insight into his process when he joined theoretical astrophysicist Dr Katie Mack and RMIT’s Lawrence Harvey, Associate Professor and Director of SIAL Sound Studios, on 29 October, 2014 at RMIT Gallery to talk about space – art – and Big Bang Sounds.

Missed the talk? Catch up with the podcast and blog – click here.

You can now see Abel Korinsky’s finished artwork using the ideas of the resonance of Big Bang sounds as inspiration for RL2000, by visiting the exhibition Experimenta Recharge: 6th International Biennial of Media Art at RMIT Gallery until 21 February.

Korinsky’s artwork RL2000 2014,sound and mixed media installation, picks up on the ideas he discussed in the Melbourne Knowledge Week talk available on podcast, and asks audiences to imagine that sound never fully disappears and is present in our universe forever. What would it sound like to hear all the sounds of the past and present? How would it change our perceptions of time and death?

Korinsky Collective: RL2000 2014 sound and mixed media installation dimenions variable. Photo Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2014

Korinsky Collective: RL2000 2014
sound and mixed media installation
dimensions variable. Photo Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2014

As part of the sound artist collective Korinsky (together with his twin brother Carlo, and younger brother Max) Abel presents the sound piece in an immersive installation inspired by the recent announcement by researchers at the Harvard-Smithsonian Centre that they had documented sound waves from the Big Bang soon after the birth of our universe. In a room in RMIT Gallery where the work is exhibited, when the lights go off intermittently the audience is plunged into darkness which quickly fills with fluorescent glow of paint on the spider-like central pod that is reminiscent perhaps of a 1950s Sci Fi movie set design. 

Korinsky Collective: RL2000 2014 sound and mixed media installation dimenions variable. Photo Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2014

Korinsky Collective: RL2000 2014
sound and mixed media installation
dimensions variable. Photo Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2014

The artists invite audiences to imagine the implications of hearing sounds from the past and to place themselves in a situation where perceptions of time, space and place might be disrupted.

Korinsky’s work has been developed during a residency with Experimenta as part of the EMARE AUS
CDN Move On Exchange (European media artists in residence in exchange with Australia and
Canada). This program is supported by the Culture 2013 Programme of the European Commission.

Meet the Artists: Experimenta Recharge Free Public Programs

Japanese artist Ei Wada at RMIT Gallery installing his work Falling Records

Japanese artist Ei Wada at RMIT Gallery installing his work Falling Records. Photo Helen Rayment.

Experimenta Recharge’s public program is your chance to meet the artists and curators behind the 6th International Biennial of Media Art and delve into the ideas behind this exhibition. We have selected artists from the exhibition to come together on a range of key thematic topics to discuss the role artists play in creatively investigating the possibilities and pushing the limits of contemporary technologies. Join us to see how artworks help us to imaginatively experience and critically reflect on the role technologies play in the transformation of art, culture and knowledge.

EVENTS ARE FREE BUT BOOKINGS PREFERRED: RMIT GALLERY (03) 9925 1717

Friday 28 November 

Event: Curator’s Tour and meet the artists.

Time: 12.30am – 2pm

Venue: RMIT Gallery

Christy Dena's Magister Ludi

Christy Dena’s Magister Ludi

Join Jonathan Parsons, Artistic Director, Experimenta & Curator of Recharge, as he guides you through Experimenta Recharge: 6th International Biennial of Media Art and delves into the ideas behind development of the exhibition theme, selection of works and introduces you to some of the artists behind the works. He will be joined by Recharge artists Raymond Zada and Christy Dena, who will discuss their work.

Christy Dena has written and produced artworks as games in her New Work Commission for Experimenta; Magister Ludi playfully investigates the recent cultural phenomena of both computer and live ‘escape room’ puzzles through an interactive game installed in a vintage school desk. Raymond Zada’s ‘Acknowledged’ examines the historical processes of erasing memory in the urban landscape of his home-town of Adelaide.

Friday 28 November 

Event: Book launch – Matthew Perkins (ed), Video Void: Australian Video Art, Australian Scholarly Publishers, 2014.

Time: 5-6 pm

Venue: RMIT Gallery

VideoVoid_Book_Launch-300x216

Join book editor Matthew Perkins and contributors in celebrating the launch of this fascinating book which will be launched as part of Experimenta’s 6th International Biennial of Media Art.

Video is one of the most visible contemporary art mediums of our time. Since the 1960s Australian artists such as David Perry, Peter Kennedy, Mike Parr, Jill Scott, Gary Willis, Stephen Jones, Bonita Ely and Lyndal Jones, to name a few, have paved the way for a new generation of artists who have taken up video as a creative medium. But anyone who wants to explore Australian video art faces the difficulty of accessing information about these works and tracing the histories that connect them. Video Void: Australian Video Art offers an in depth study of video art in Australia from the 1960s into a new millennium considering the next generation of artists such as Shaun Gladwell, David Rosetzky, Monika Tichacek, Daniel von Sturmer, Catherine Bell and Angelica Mesiti. With contributors John Conomos, Matthew Perkins, Stephen Jones, Jacqueline Millner, Darren Tofts, Daniel Palmer and Anne Marsh.

Friday 28 November 

Film Screening: GOOGLE AND THE WORLD BRAIN + Q&A

With guest speakers: Justine Hyde – Director Library Services and Experience – State Library of Victoria, Danny van der Kleij – La Société Anonyme, in conversation with Simon Abrahams – Freelance creative producer

Venue: RMIT Kaleide Theatre, Building 8, 360 Swanston Street, Melbourne

Feature length Documentary Film, 90 minutes (2013)

Time: 6-8pm

GOOGLE AND THE WORLD BRAIN, directed by Ben Lewis, radically questions the nature of the Internet by looking at the story of Google Books. Google Books, Google’s unprecedented project to scan all books thus realising mankind’s ancient dream of a universal library was stopped in an American court after an international campaign. The futuristic world of the Net meets the traditional culture of the library through interviews with the world’s leading Internet thinkers and librarian-scholars. The film uses Google Books as a prism through which issues of data-mining, copyright, freedom and surveillance are illuminated.

Saturday 29 November

Artist Talk: Ei Wada on his work Falling Records

Time: 1-1.30pm

Venue:  Gallery 3, RMIT Gallery

Japanese musician and artist Ei Wada uses a combination of old electric and acoustic instruments to create multi-channel performance arrangements. His work Falling Records is a poetic sound installation that imagines a future civilisation’s misinterpretation of a common 20th century artefact – analogue tape recordings. His work alerts us to the potential pitfalls when we attempt to capture and catalogue knowledge from the past. 

Saturday 29 November

Experimenta Recharge Opening Weekend Media Art Seminar

Venue:  RMIT University, Building 16, Level 7, Green Brain, 342 – 344 Swanston Street, Melbourne

Event one: 1.30 – 2.30 pm Echoes from the past Chair – Professor Darren Tofts, Media and Communications, Swinburne University. Panel: Svenja Kratz, Khaled Sabsabi, Abel Korinsky.

Event Two: 2.30 – 3.30pm Digital Age Archive Makers – Chair – Senior Curator Geraldine Barlow, Monash University Museum of Art. Panel: Leisa Shelton, Danny van der Kleij, Emma Ramsay.

Event three: 3.30-4.00 pm Embodied Knowledge – Anaisa Franco in conversation with Lisa Gye, Senior Lecturer – Media and Communications, Swinburne University.

(due to unforeseen circumstances Garry Stewart and Maree Clarke are unable to attend this session as previously advertised)

Join us for one, two or all three panel discussions located at the RMIT Green Brain seminar room next to RMIT Gallery. The panels are designed to run for 30-50 minutes each, with time allowed for questions and a five minute break between sessions.

Event details

 

Image: "70,000 Veils" by Khaled Sabsabi

Image: “70,000 Veils” by Khaled Sabsabi

Event one: Echoes from the past:  Panel: Svenja Kratz, Khaled Sabsabi, Abel Korinsky

This panel shows how the use of contemporary technologies can transform our view and understanding of the world. In The Contamination of Alice: Instance #8 Svenja Kratz comments on the transformative capabilities of Alice’s cells, an 11 year old girl who died of cancer in 1971 and whose cells, donated to science, have since proliferated in science laboratories across the globe. Khaled Sabsabi transgressive practice immerses us in a plethora of visual material, the physical evidence of his memory, with his 100 screens in his work 70,000 veils. While Korinsky’s Big Bang speculates on the new possibilities now that scientists having found remnant sounds originating in the birth of the universe.

La Societe Anonyme, The SKOR Codex

La Societe Anonyme, The SKOR Codex

Event two: Digital Age Archive Makers: Panel: Leisa Shelton, Danny van der Kleij, Emma Ramsay

This panel examines the way that history can disappear and reappear and the role that artists can play in countering cultural and historical amnesia. All of the artists on this panel have considered the role of archiving in the digital age. Leisa Shelton’s Mapping our Media Art is collecting stories from audiences of their seminal memories of media art experiences. Danny van der Kleiji speaks to the challenge of how to document the stories of one of the Netherlands dynamic arts organisations closed due to recent government funding cuts. Emma Ramsay worked with curator Alex White to create Tele Visions Afterlude so that Biennial audiences can surf with a remote control to access many of the live performance works and other works created for a TV broadcast from Carriageworks in Sydney to mark the end of analogue TV in Australia in 2013.

Donation of Skor Codex to State Library of Victoria

Paranoia by Anaisa Franco

Paranoia by Anaisa Franco

Event three: Embodied Knowledge Panel: Garry Stewart, Anaisa Franco, Maree Clarke

In this panel each artist explores the role of the body as a holder of knowledge and memory. Choreographer Garry Stewart in his collaborative film project Collision Course reveals the subtle differences of dancers and sports-peoples differing training through the use of slow motion film. Anaisa Franco in her Psychosomatic series creates interactive sculptures representing and eliciting from audiences different human emotions. Maree Clarke in Born of the land speaks about how the body holds knowledge through ritual.

Thursday 27 November to Saturday 29 November

Mapping Our Media Art: Leisa Shelton

Venue: RMIT Gallery

Times:

27/11/14 – 6-8 pm

28/11/14 – 12-3 pm

29/11/14 – 12-2 pm, 4-5 pm

What would a map of Australian media art look like? Leisa Shelton invites audiences to share their stories at RMIT Gallery in this audience inclusive artwork.

Leisa Shelton invites audiences to share their stories at RMIT Gallery 

What would a map of Australian media art look like? Leisa Shelton invites audiences to share their stories in this audience inclusive artwork at RMIT Gallery. Leisa is a performance artist, maker and curator whose practice foregrounds collaboration and advocacy for new Australian transdisciplinary work. Her practice concentrates on the development of new frames for the presentation of performance. Leisa is also dedicated to delivering greater environmental sustainability within the arts and performance sectors.

 

 

Sounds Like Deep Space – Big Bang Sounds podcast is live

Sounds Like Deep Space...(left to right) Dr Katie Mack, Abel Korinsky and Lawrence Harvey

(left to right) Dr Katie Mack, Abel Korinsky and Lawrence Harvey

Time, space, distance – who isn’t fascinated by what’s up in the stars and beyond?  Artists have been gazing to the heavens since they picked up something to draw with and record what they saw with their eyes and imaginations. So it is no surprise then that in 2014, an experimental artist has turned to the cosmos for inspiration.

Working with multichannel sound installations, artist German artist Abel Korinsky questions what could happen if sounds from the past could be reconstructed and heard. What would the Big Bang sound like? A new work by Korinsky is included in the upcoming Experimenta Recharge 6th International Biennial of Media Art exhibition held at RMIT Gallery from 28 November 2014 to 21 February 2015.

As a preview of things to come, he joined theoretical astrophysicist Dr Katie Mack and RMIT’s Lawrence Harvey, Associate Professor and Director of SIAL Sound Studios, on 29 October, 2014 at RMIT Gallery to talk about space – art – and Big Bang Sounds.

Missed it? Listen to the podcast here:

As Lawrence Harvey pondered, why does the notion of the Big Bang hold such a fascination for people? It was a full house for the talk, with artists, scientists, and those simply fascinated by the concepts listening to the trio talk. Dr Sarah Jane Pell, an artist exploring the Aesthetics & Technics of Human Performance Exploration, grabbed a front row seat and questioned Abel Korinsky about placing himself in unusual environments to create his work and find inspiration for sound art and performance.

Artist Sarah Jane Pell and Abel Korinsky

Artist Sarah Jane Pell and Abel Korinsky

IMG_5601The audience sat enthralled, surrounded for the talk by the spectacular artwork from Balgo in the exhibition Warlayirti: The Art of Balgo. The exhibition has now come down to make way for Experimenta Recharge, which opens on 28 November – but Warlayirti: The Art of Balgo can be seen in the NT, at the Araluen Arts Centre (28 November – 15 February 2015).

IMG_5592

IMG_5597Katie Mack (@AstroKatie) suggested people are fascinated by space – and the Big Bang – because everyone wants to know where we came from and has a curiosity about the beginning and the end and what it would have been like at the beginning of time. Dr Mack is a theoretical astrophysicist. Throughout her career as a researcher at Caltech, Princeton, Cambridge, and now Melbourne University, she has studied dark matter, black holes, cosmic strings, and the formation of the first galaxies in the Universe.

IMG_5608

“I can think of time as distance – the concept of now is tricky. I can’t observe now anywhere else – if you are moving quickly time passes differently. Time and space are linked together.

“Time passes and things end but everything follows on from everything else. If we were on a planet 65 million light years ago and we had a powerful enough telescope we could see the dinosaurs on earth.”

IMG_5609

Interestingly, Kate spoke about how she uses art when thinking about time and space, referencing works such as Salvador Dalí’s The Persistence of Memory. The works from Balgo were another example of how the resonance of sound and ideas of time and space might be imagined, she said.

Warlayirti: The Art of Balgo  at RMIT Gallery, 16 September – Saturday 8 November, 2014. Photo: Mark Ashkanasy, 2014.

Warlayirti: The Art of Balgo at RMIT Gallery, 16 September – Saturday 8 November, 2014. Photo: Mark Ashkanasy, 2014.

The audience then heard a snippet of Abel Korinsky’s big bang sounds…..

The Big Bang Sounds talk release on podcast is timely indeed with the successful landing of a robotic spacecraft on a comet for the first time in history. Rosetta mission’s safe landing on gives scientists their first chance to ride a comet and study close up what happens as it gets closer to the sun.

Both scientists and artists reach for the stars when they launch ambitious projects. Their ambitions and fearlessness are about the challenge of being bold and not being afraid. The success of the Big Bang Sounds talk is a small step in this direction – the Rosetta Mission a cosmic and large one – and ventures are mirrored in the bold, ambitious new media works that will be on show at the  Experimenta Recharge 6th International Biennial of Media Art exhibition held at RMIT Gallery from 28 November 2014 to 21 February 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Experimenta Recharge Countdown: 15 days to go

Ei Wada

Experimenta Recharge: 6th international biennial of media art

RMIT Gallery, Melbourne – 28 November 2014 – 21 February 2015

Experimenta presents a collection of 18 works from Australian and international artists who question how technology and cultural contexts create new perspectives on knowledge.

From unconventional perspectives, can experimental artists illuminate existing knowledge and meaning for a new generation? The Experimenta 6th International Biennial of Media Art explores whether artists lead us to entirely new modes of consciousness. 

Artists Appearing at RMIT Gallery

These images, links and clips are just indicative samples of some of the participating artist’s work, not necessarily actual works they will be presenting at RMIT Gallery during the exhibition. 

Ei Wada (Japan)

Ei Wada’s poetic sound installation imagines a future civilisation’s misinterpretation of a common 20th century artefact – analogue tape recordings. Toki Ori Ori Nasu (Falling Records) (2013) was a Jury Selection in the 17th Japan Media Arts Festival 2014.

Ei Wada’s participation in Recharge has been supported by the Japan Foundation.

Cake Industries (Australia)

Dean Petersen and Jesse Stevens have worked under the collaborative pseudonym of Cake Industries since 2006. Their practice uses electro-mechanics and robotics to create anthropomorphic and autonomous objects that embrace retro-futurism.

An Experimenta New Work Commission.

Maree Clarke

Maree Clarke, a Mutti Mutti, Yorta Yorta, Boonwurrung woman from northwest Victoria. She is a pivotal figure in the reclamation of southeast Australian Aboriginal art practices, reviving elements of Aboriginal culture that were lost over the period of colonisation. Clarke’s installations of photography, painting and sculpture further explore the rituals and ceremonies of her ancestors.

  • Maitha Demithan (United Arab Emirates)

Maitha Demithan works across photography, scanography, drawing, painting and photo transfer to weave together scans of her fellow citizens, traditional cultural imagery and contemporary practice. In perfecting the technique of using a flatbed printer to take multiple images of her subjects, Demithan combines the mechanical with the emotional in her deconstructed portraits.

Christy Dena

Collaboration with Marigold Barlett, Trevor Dikes, & Cameron Owen

Christy Dena is a writer, designer and director who has worked on pervasive, digital and card games, theatre performances, and films. Dena was granted Australia’s first Digital Writing Residency at The Cube, QUT to create the large installation “Robot University”. Her web audio adventure “AUTHENTIC IN ALL CAPS” won the WA Premier’s Book Award for Digital Narrative and the Australian Writers’ Guild award for Interactive Media, and was Official Selection at the 2014 Media Arts Show for the Electronic Literature Organization. Dena’s works explore our relationship with technology, death, and our past.

An Experimenta New Work Commission.

 Anaisa Franco (Germany/Brazil)

Inspired by psychology, dreams and the possibilities inherent in DIY electrical engineering, Anaisa Franco animates objects with behaviours and feelings, inviting audiences to respond and engage, blurring the boundaries between body, mind and machine.

Anaisa Franco is in residence at the University of Technology Sydney’s Creativity and Cognition Studios as a part of the EMARE AUS CDN Move On Exchange (European Media Artist in Residence Exchange with Australia and Canada). Supported by the Culture 2013 program of the European Commission and the Goethe Institut.

  • Abel Korinsky  (Germany)

Korinsky are a sound collective of three brothers whose work concentrates on the emotional and physical effect that directional sound has upon listeners. Using custom-developed software called ‘Vertical Sound Lab’, Korinsky conflate sound with visual material to produce rich, multi-layered auditory and visual illusions, often in unique architectural locations.

Abel Korinsky is Experiment’a artist-in-residence as part of the EMARE AUS CDN Move On Exchange (European Media Artists in Residence Exchange with Australia and Canada). This program is supported by the Culture 2013 Program of the European Commission and the Goethe Institut. Hosted by RMIT School of Art International Artist in Residency Program.

Svenja Kratz is an interdisciplinary artist who utilises traditional and experimental bio-art practices to explore the impact of new technologies and science on concepts of the self, other and the body. From 2007 to 2012, Kratz worked with the Tissue Repair and Regeneration (TRR) Group at the Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane.

An Experimenta New Work Commission.

Khaled Sabsabi’s practice spans video, sculpture and painting, though is most recognised for his multi-screen immersive and site-specific installations. Sabsabi’s work transgresses borders and encourages cross-cultural dialogue, focussing critical attention on experiences related to conflict, ideologies and spirituality.

Leisa Shelton is a performance artist, maker and curator whose practice foregrounds collaboration and advocacy for new Australian transdisciplinary work. Her practice concentrates on the development of new frames for the presentation of performance. Shelton is also dedicated to delivering greater environmental sustainability within the arts and performance sectors.

An Experimenta New Work Commission.

  • teamLab (Japan)

teamLab was founded by Toshiyuki Inoko in 2001, and has been at the forefront of digital innovation and art since. teamLab are a technologist company of engineers, mathematicians, architects, CG animators, web designers, graphic designers, artists, editors and more. In their creative practice, teamLab produce a range of polished media art works spanning locative media, robotics, interactive sound installations and immersive environments.

  • Tele Visions Afterlude (Australia)

TELE VISIONS Afterlude

In the final days of analog TV transmission in Australia, Tele Visions created a temporary TV Station broadcasting 24hrs a day from the 28th of November to the 3rd of December 2013.

Join us in Tele Visions Afterlude as we present the best moments of the broadcast that marked the passing of TV and re-imagined what might have been.

  • Darrin Verhagen and Stuart McFarlane (Australia)

Stuart McFarlane and Darrin Verhagen explore how the simplest of objects may be transformed into something startling and mesmerising through the use of technology.

Verhagen and McFarlane are Melbourne based artists working across a variety of art and design disciplines. Their collaborative works emphasise emotion in relation to light, motion and narrative.

  • Yunkuura Billy Atkins and Sohan Ariel Hayes (Australia)

Yunkurra Billy Atkins and Sohan Ariel Hayes

Yunkurra Billy Atkins collaboration with Sohan Ariel Hayes retells an ancient story as a startling digital animation. Yunkurra is a Martu elder (from the Western Desert, West Australia), steeped in the knowledge of important Martu sites and their stories. Sohan Ariel Hayes is an award winning animator based in Perth.

  • Raymond Zada (Australia)

Raymond Zada

Raymond Zada is an emerging artist working primarily with photography, video, and digital design. He is of the Barkindji/Paakintji Peoples, South Australia.

In 2013 Zada won the New Media category of the 30th Telstra National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Art Award.

ABEL KORINSKY IN APHRA MAGAZINE

Experimenta artist Abel Korinsky – who will speak about his work at RMIT Gallery tonight in the Big Bang Sounds event – is featured in a new article by APHRA magazine online.

Abel Korinsky one of the three brothers in the Korinsky collective (Germany). Their immersive installations and public sound works explore the emotional and physical effects of directional sound. Implementing their own  custom-developed software called ‘Vertical Sound Lab’, Korinsky produce highly rich, multi-layered auditory and visual illusions.
On Wednesday 29 October from 5.30-7 pm, Abel will join Lawrence Harvey, Associate Professor and Director SIAL Sound Studios, RMIT University and American astrophysicist Dr Katie Mack about dark matter, black holes and how new research and finding may change our lives in the future.
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Abel Korinsky is Experiment’a artist-in-residence as part of the EMARE AUS CDN Move On Exchange (European Media Artists in Residence Exchange with Australia and Canada). This program is supported by the Culture 2013 Program of the European Commission and the Goethe Institut. Abel is pictured above with (far right) Gabriele Urban, Cultural officer from the Goethe-Institut Australien (Melbourne) at the recent Recharge Experimenta sixth international of biennial art launch.

Abel Korinsky is hosted by RMIT School of Art International Artist in Residency Program.

To learn more about Korinsky’s work read the APHRA article here.
A new work by Korinsky is included in the upcoming Experimenta Recharge 6th International Biennial of Media Art exhibition held at RMIT Gallery from 28 November 2014 to 21 February 2015.
Seating limited for the Big Bang Sounds talk: Bookings essential: (03) 9925 1717.

Big Bang Sounds – Art and Astrophysics at RMIT Gallery

Abel_Korinsky

What does the very distant past sound like? Can the Big Bang be seen and heard today? What place does it hold in scientific and artistic discourse?

Join us for a stellar discussion at RMIT Gallery on Wednesday 29 October from 5.30 – 6 pm, starting with drinks provided by the EU Centre at RMIT, and viewing of our current exhibitions Warlayirti: The Art of Balgo, and Garnkiny: Constellations of Meaningthen Big Bang Sounds from 6-7 pm.

German artist Abel Korinsky (above), American astrophysicist Dr Katie Mack (@AstroKatie) and RMIT’s Associate Professor Lawrence Harvey (below, left) Director SIAL Sound Studios will talk about dark matter, black holes and how new research and findings into Big Bang Sounds may change our lives in the future.

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Dr Katherine (Katie) Mack (below) is a theoretical astrophysicist. Her work focuses on finding new ways to learn about the early universe and fundamental physics using astronomical observations, probing the building blocks of nature by examining the cosmos on the largest scales. Throughout her career as a researcher at Caltech, Princeton, Cambridge, and now Melbourne University, she has studied dark matter, black holes, cosmic strings, and the formation of the first galaxies in the universe.

KatieMack

Abel Korinsky is currently in residence with Experimenta at RMIT Project Space, supported by EMARE (European Media Art Residency Exchange). He recently won the 2014 Mercedes-Benz Kunst Award and exhibited in Inter Spaces, Trieste Contemporanea, Trieste, Italy; International Scenography Biennial, Ludwigsburg, Germany; and Kraftwerk, Berlin.

KorinskyArtCollective

Abel Korinsky is a member of the art collective ‘Korinsky’ (pictured above) who are devoted to new sound interpretations and the artistic organisation of sound played upon vertical surfaces. ‘Korinsky’ stage three-dimensional tonal effects on vertical surfaces creating unique audio-visual experiences.

Working with multichannel sound installations, Abel Korinsky questions what could happen if sounds from the past could be reconstructed and hearable again?  What would the Big Bang sound like? If we knew, what would be the consequences for society, politics and history?

Big Bang Sounds is a pre-exhibition talk for the upcoming exhibition Experimenta Recharge 6th International Biennial of Media Art – RMIT Gallery, Melbourne, 28 November 2014 – 21 February 2015. Recharge delves into the nature of experimental practice, celebrating those inventive artists whose work is consciously inspired by and entangled in the past. According to the curator Jonathan Parsons, much of our current knowledge and meaning has deep roots, perfect for artists to explore using the most contemporary of tools. A new work by Abel Korinsky is included in the exhibition.

“You can’t really go further into the past than the Big Bang,” Mr Parsons (pictured, below right, with Abel Korinsky) said.

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Event: Big Bang Sounds

Date: 29 October 2014

Time: 5.30 pm – 6 pm: Drinks and viewing of art exhibitions Warlayirti: The Art of Balgo and Garnkiny: Constellations of Meaning. Drinks provided by the EU Centre at RMIT.

6 pm – 7 pm: Public talk

Location: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street Melbourne, 3000.

Bookings: RSVP necessary. Free but seating strictly limited. Ph: (03) 9925 1717.

The EU Centre at RMIT is co-funded through a Grant from the European Union and RMIT University.