RMIT Gallery’s White Night – the artists’ perspective

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Did you love White Night? The Age’s Deputy Arts editor Hannah Francis selected RMIT Gallery as one of her top Northside tips: “Morbis Artis – diseases of the arts. RMIT Gallery. This was a cracking group exhibition where art met science and wonderful things happened. The oozy projections out front made your hair curl. The lines were long and when I finally got in, there was another 40-minute wait for one of the exhibits.”

But what went on behind the scenes? Did the artists love the result as much? What about the process?

RMIT lecturer Dr Joshua Batty (of MindBuffer) was part of the team (along with digital artist Andy Thomas) who put on Ectoplasm, the audio reactive light display that enthralled the long – long long – queues outside RMIT Gallery on White Night.

“We had a great time putting together and delivering the show for this years white night,” said Josh. “It was the culmination of a four month collaboration with Andy Thomas and us (MindBufer) to really exploit the architectural features of the facade.

“We felt the piece was amplified this year with the inclusion of the sonic element (by RMIT Alumnus Mitchell Nordine) which really created a nice space for people to experience the projections.img_5402

“Overall we learned a lot, received great feedback from the public and the organisers of white night, and definitely see more projects in the future collaborating with Andy.

“We are looking forward to cutting the footage we got of the night so we can share the experience with those that couldn’t make it both locally and overseas. Thanks RMIT Gallery for the amazing opportunity!”img_5329

Next door to RMIT Gallery, the RMIT Storey Hall annex lit up with a compelling animation of Jazmina Cininas’ Girlie Werewolf Project. While MindBuffer were perched on the roof opposite Storey hall to project their light show, Dr Cininas, artist and RMIT printmaking lecturer, had the warmth and comfort of the table of the fast food outlet opposite, where the projector was set up.

Jazmina continues the story.

“My involvement in White Night took me into all sorts of unexpected and previously unexplored territories, not least of which was the first floor of Hungry Jacks, where the projector for What Big Teeth You Have was located.

The floor was closed to the public for the night making it a surreal, solitary oasis of calm (notwithstanding the ubiquitous MTV soundtrack from the mounted televisions) from which to witness the immediate projections and the heaving crowds below.

“The first (and only) projection test for my work had taken place a mere two weeks earlier, before the final form of the work could be determined, so I only had a rough idea of what to expect.control-booth2

“I can’t deny the thrill of witnessing my girlie werewolves emerging larger-than-life from the Storey Hall annex façade as the sun went down, and the enormous sense of relief in seeing that it was, indeed, working.

“There was also a delight in the annex’s unexpectedly ‘collaborative’ role in the work. Neither the projections nor the façade dominated the other, the two instead working together to create something entirely new.img_5325“The real magic for me began, however, when I saw a young girl standing on the wooden bench in front of the façade, posing for a photograph. She was the first of a number of members of the public – predominantly women – who made use of this photo opportunity.

“For me, it was touching to witness women (and occasional male) of all ages and all creeds physically embedding themselves within these images of female empowerment.

“The atmosphere — and lasting impression — was one of celebration, heightened by the carnivalesque hues of the annex façade.”

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