Touch me: Alison Bennett speaks about ‘expanded photography’ on 6 December 1-2 pm

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Bruise, 2015, by Alison Bennett. Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts Installation image by Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2016.

Artist Alison Bennett works in ‘expanded photography’ where the boundaries of photography have shifted in the transition to digital media and become diffused into ubiquitous computing.

Her work has generated international viral media attention more than once and features in the current RMIT Gallery exhibition Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts at RMIT Gallery (17 November – 18 February 2016)an interactive bio-art exhibition that uses actual and metaphoric communicative diseases to explore the fractured relationship between human and non-human life.

Alison Bennett will be speaking about her work and ‘expanded photography’ at RMIT Gallery on Tuesday 6 December from 1-2 pm.

Her interactive piece Bruise is a touch-based screen work that presents the viewer with a high-resolution scan of bruised skin. Invited to touch the soft and damaged tissue before them, their eyes become organs of touch, and their fingers work as sensory digits that feel as they move over what becomes a damaged but delicate bio-art surface.

Bennett’s recent projects explored the creative potentials of augmented reality, stereophotogrammetry, 3D scanning, and virtual reality as encompassed by the medium and practice of photography.

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Artist Alison Bennett with her interactive work Bruise at RMIT Gallery.

As a neuroqueer trans-media artist, Bennett’s work has explored the performance and technology of gender identity and considered the convergence of biological and digital skin as virtual prosthesis.

What: Alison Bennett artist talk on ‘expanded photography’

When: Tuesday 6 December, 1-2 pm

Where: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street, Melbourne.

Bookings: register

Artist talk: Jodi Sita: the creative relationship between art and science practice

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Seeing the future: Jodi Sita’s image of her own eye revealed the early stages of glaucoma, a largely an invisible eye disease.

Jodi Sita is an academic and researcher in the areas of neuroscience and anatomy, and with a leading interest in the creative relationship between art and science practice.

She will be speaking about her work in Morbis Artis: Diseases of the Arts at RMIT Gallery, along with Alison Bennett on Tuesday 6 December 1-2 pm at RMIT Gallery.

Jodi’s fascination for understanding how anatomical systems work and her strong visual tendencies have seen her research, teach and create artwork around the ecology of the human body.

“The Macular collection shows one normal and four degenerated eyeballs allowing us to glimpse the heinous beauty of this pathological and debilitating condition,” Jodi said.

“The Retina collection allows a look into the dark spaces of the eye…and My Eye are images of my own eye, showing a normal healthy eyeball structure – except for an image (pictured above) in which it was discovered I was in the early stages of glaucoma.

“In the Pupils collection (below), the colours and palates of the iris have been enhanced to create images that evoke landscapes, lightning strikes, planets and flowers – all scenes we scan with our irises. Hidden only to vision scientists and specialists, are the amazing landscapes found at the back of the eyeball; the retina, the macular and the fovea.”

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Jodi Sita with her work in Morbis Artis: the colours and palates of the iris have been enhanced to create images that evoke landscapes, lightning strikes, planets and flowers.

Jodi Sita is currently editing an anthology on Eye Tracking The Moving Image with Bloomsbury Press.

What: Jodi Sita artist talk on the creative relationship between art and science practice

When: Tuesday 6 December, 1-2 pm

Where: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street, Melbourne.

Bookings: register

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