Expanding print panel discussion: what next for print?

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Performprint, is a collective featuring two artists and an anonymous skateboarder, takes printmaking off the walls and out of the gallery. Photo by Tobias Titz.

Using the premise of the matrix, from which all prints emanate, the RMIT printmaking exhibition Out of the Matrix at RMIT Gallery (6 May-11 June) invites viewers to explore new ways of thinking about printmaking.

Join printmakers Jazmina Cininas, Joel Gailer, Bridget Hillebrand, Clare Humphries and  Andrew Tetzlaff on Thursday 12 May, 5.30-6.30 pm as they discuss what it means as an artist to be print informed, and how they use both analogue and digital techniques in their work, and ponder the nature and future of printmaking.

What: The expanding print – panel discussion

When: Thursday 12 May, 5.30-6.30 pm

Where: Green Brain RMIT, Storey Hall, Level 7, 344 Swanston Street, Melbourne. (NOTE: we have moved the event next door from RMIT Gallery due to size of the audience and restrictions of gallery space).

Bookings: free – register here for seating.

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Andrew Tetzlaff with his work Yarra (suspended), 2015. Inkjet fabric print.

RMIT University has a long tradition of pushing the boundaries of printmaking, and this exciting new exhibition at RMIT Gallery brings together a group of artists who activate an expanded understanding of print practice, and who all have a connection to the RMIT printmaking studio either as staff or alumni.

With 2016 declared ‘the year of print’ in celebration of the Print Council of Australia’s 50th anniversary, Out of the Matrix focuses the spotlight firmly on the outstanding achievements of RMIT printmakers over the past 65 years, and their current agency within the wider print community.

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Clare Humphries, installing her work What remains, what returns, 2016. in Out of the Matrix at RMIT Gallery.

About the panel

CHAIR: Jazmina Cininas’s technically demanding reduction linocuts of female werewolves have been exhibited extensively both nationally and internationally. The unconventional portraits feature in ABCTV’s Re-Enchantment documentary project and can be found in many major Australian public collections. Jazmina completed her PhD project The Girlie Werewolf Hall of Fame in 2014.

Joel Gailer’s work directs its focus to the mass produced and commercial world of print and copy-based technologies. Highlighting our excessive and compliant consumption of printed media his prints are a light-hearted reverence for printmaking and its relationship to mass production, media and print processes. Gailer’s practice is extended through the collaborative development Performprint.

Bridget Hillebrand is completing her practice-based PhD at Monash University. She has a Master Degree in Fine Art, RMIT University where she lectures in the Print Imaging Practice Studio at the School of Art. She has won a number of printmaking awards and is represented in numerous collections in Australia and overseas.

Clare Humphries current practice explores objects of the deceased and notions of materiality within rituals of bereavement. She is a lecturer in Drawing and Printmedia at the Victorian College of the Arts and has work represented in major public collections including the National Gallery of Australia.

Andrew Tetzlaff is a Melbourne-based artist, curator and academic. His practice considers the felt bodily encounter of matter, phenomena and site—specifically focusing on ways in which material objects can reveal or allude to intangible forces. Recent projects include: 2015 – The Door in the Wall, Yarra (suspended), CONCRETE POST 3 and Tomorrow Never Dies; and 2014 – Situations and Displace.

 

 

 

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