Last days: current RMIT Gallery exhibitions close on 30 May

RMIT Gallery Unfolding: New Indian Textiles, RMIT Gallery, 20 MAR 2015 - 30 MAY 2015 - photo by Mark Ashkanasy.

RMIT Gallery Unfolding: New Indian Textiles, RMIT Gallery, 20 MAR 2015 – 30 MAY 2015 – photo by Mark Ashkanasy.

The current exhibitions at RMIT Gallery – Unfolding: New Indian Textiles, Backs of Banaras by Terry Burrows and Art After Fukushima: Return of Godzilla close at 5 pm on Saturday 30 May. Don’t miss seeing these visually compelling shows. Here is what others are saying about them:

“Loving these brilliant colors!” That’s a typical comment from audiences who come to Unfolding: New Indian Textiles, which celebrates the handmade and strong tradition craftsmanship in Indian villages, and the innovative designers who meld the old and the new to reach out to a global audience.

“This is an outstanding exhibition of color and texture, that has opened our eyes to an India of which we were unaware,” is a comment in our visitor’s book.

This is echoed by other comments – “Indian textiles – wool stitching is incredible – excellent exhibition!”; “Visually and technically magnificent!”; “An amazing, inspiring, surprising, beautiful exhibition…a truly memorable and very beautiful experience to behold.”

RMIT Gallery: Unfolding: New Indian Textiles, 20 MAR 2015 - 30 MAY 2015 Indian textile designers are the envy of the rest of the world because they continue to have close, easy contact with all manner of hand production and crafts no longer available elsewhere. Photo by Mark Ashkanasy, 2015

RMIT Gallery: Unfolding: New Indian Textiles, 20 MAR 2015 – 30 MAY 2015
Indian textile designers are the envy of the rest of the world because they continue to have close, easy contact with all manner of hand production and crafts no longer available elsewhere. Photo by Mark Ashkanasy, 2015

The complementary exhibition Backs of Banaras, by Terry Burrows, presents a display of large photographic prints that lines up many torsos along the ghats of the Ganges at Varanasi (Banaras). Banaras is known as the city of Shiva, one of India’s most revered sites of Hindu ritual, and the exhibition invites viewers to explore another side of India.

The exhibition provides a visual contrast with Unfolding: New Indian Textiles and this dichotomy between high fashion and the textiles worn by villagers in rural India is a deliberate choice by RMIT Gallery Director and Chief Curator Suzanne Davies.

RMIT Gallery Director Suzanne Davies with artist Terry Burrows at his RMIT Gallery exhibition Baccks of Banaras, a curated selection of works from his book which they are holding. Photo: Evelyn Tsitas

RMIT Gallery Director Suzanne Davies with artist Terry Burrows at his RMIT Gallery exhibition Baccks of Banaras, a curated selection of works from his book which they are holding. Photo: Evelyn Tsitas

“The aim of the exhibitions is to showcase the 21 st century application of Indian craftsmanship to an international audience, and to reveal also the everyday, ordinary textiles worn in rural areas,” Ms Davies said.

“We wanted people to have a meditative experience when they viewed Backs of Banaras, and pause to enjoy a sense of calm.”

And it worked – in the visitor’s book, someone notes; “Terry Burrows photos were outstanding. An intriguing set that kept revealing more and more on many levels; aesthetic, social, patterns, texture, shapes – wonderful. Thoroughly enjoyed the exhibition and it opened my eyes to new ways of seeing.”

RMIT Gallery 20 Mar 2015 - 30 May 2015 Japanese Art After Fukushima: Return of Godzilla: photo by Mark Ashkanasy, 2015

RMIT Gallery
20 Mar 2015 – 30 May 2015
Japanese Art After Fukushima: Return of Godzilla: photo by Mark Ashkanasy, 2015

One of the great strengths of a university public art gallery is its ability to explore often provocative ideas and challenge viewers, showcasing how artists have responded to certain events or ideas. This is the case in the third exhibition at RMIT Gallery, shown alongside Unfolding: New Indian Textiles and Backs of Banaras.

The exhibition Japanese Art After Fukushima: Return of Godzilla is curated by Associate Professor Linda Williams, RMIT School of Art, and draws inspiration from two major events in Japan that led to radioactive contamination: the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 and the 2011 tsunami. Art After Fukushima questions the benign effects of the use of nuclear power, as explored through the work of six Japanese artists.

One visitor commented; “An excellent showing of three very different exhibitions. The Indian materials are stunning. The Japanese exhibition is so powerful and hauntingly beautiful in its vulnerability. The Backs of Banaras captures each moment in time with exquisite human stories. Thank you!”

Here at RMIT Gallery we work with a passion for the arts and are firm believers in the power of cultural diplomacy and the ability of the arts to move and affect people. Perhaps it is too big a task to ask any artform to be able to change people’s perspectives, but we do believe that well curated exhibitions have an impact on people, even if it is just an opportunity to take a moment to think – and view – things differently.

RMIT Gallery 20 Mar 2015 - 30 May 2015 Japanese Art After Fukushima: Return of Godzilla:  close up of new commissioned work by Yutaka Kobayashi - ‘Absorption Ripples – Melt down melt away’ 2015, made from  Zeolite, Lichen and mixed media.  Installation photo by Mark Ashkanasy, 2015.

RMIT Gallery
20 Mar 2015 – 30 May 2015
Japanese Art After Fukushima: Return of Godzilla: close up of new commissioned work by Yutaka Kobayashi – ‘Absorption Ripples – Melt down melt away’ 2015, made from
Zeolite, Lichen and mixed media. Installation photo by Mark Ashkanasy, 2015.

We are always attentive to the comments in our visitor book, and are often very moved by what people choose to spend time to write and tell us about their experience. Here are some more highlights:

“As a disability support pensioner with acquired brain injury, it was wonderful to attend an exhibition free of charge…thank you very much for what I saw and this wonderful opportunity.”

“Positive – positive – positive! A challenge to deadly uranium. Keep it in the ground. This art is revolutionary!”

Art as a Healing Process: Ken + Julia Yonetani at RMIT Gallery

Ken and Julia Yonetani under their 'Crystal Palace' chandelier at RMIT Gallery in the exhibition Japanese Art After Fukushima. Photo: Evelyn Tsitas

Ken and Julia Yonetani under their ‘Crystal Palace’ chandelier at RMIT Gallery in the exhibition Japanese Art After Fukushima. Photo: Evelyn Tsitas

“We consider our works as a kind of healing process,” Ken + Julia Yonetani.

The large audience that gathered at RMIT Gallery on 26 May for the talk by artists Ken and Julia Yonetani ranged in age from school groups to art scene stalwarts and those with a strong interest in environmental issues. They were interested in the compelling narrative of the collaborative duos works which focus on environmental issues through a highly poetic aesthetic.

The Yonetanis work in the RMIT Gallery exhibition Japanese Art After Fukushima: Return of Godzilla (until 30 May), comprises of a disturbingly beautiful sign that glows with the word ‘radioactive’ and two beguilingly beautiful chandeliers from a larger installation of 31 works entitled ‘Crystal Palace: The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nuclear Nations’ (2013).

Julia and Ken Yonetani at RMIT Gallery for their artist talk on May 26. Works behind them are from the exhibition

Julia and Ken Yonetani at RMIT Gallery for their artist talk on May 26. Works behind them are from the exhibition “Terry Burrows – Backs of Banaras’. Photo: Evelyn Tsitas

Presented in a black room at RMIT Gallery, the two chandeliers are theatrical but eerie, emitting a compelling green glow. One question from a member of the audience upon hearing that these reconstructed light fittings were made from depleted uranium crystal was – ‘where do you source such a thing?’ Forget all the James Bond movies you have seen – the answer, as Julia told a bemused group, was the Internet.

“Of course!” added Ken. “Where we all buy everything! It’s no secret – you can get the uranium crystals on the Internet.”

Ken and Julia Yonetani under the 'Crystal Palace' chandelier made from depleted uranium crystal and sourced from the Internet. Photo: Evelyn tsitas

Ken and Julia Yonetani under the ‘Crystal Palace’ chandelier made from depleted uranium crystal and sourced from the Internet. Photo: Evelyn Tsitas

Harder to find, obviously are ideas – specifically, as one person in the audience observed – ‘how do you convey complex ideas about the environment, such as radioactivity and salinity, in artworks?”

Of course, that is a question for audiences to ponder and artists to execute. Some inkling of the combination of skills both ken and Julia bring to their artistic collaborations can be seen in their resumes – Ken Yonetani received a Bachelor of Economics in Japan and worked in the Foreign Exchange Market in Tokyo for three years, in a highly stressful job. Following this, he was an assistant for pottery master, Toshio Kinjo, oldest son of Jiro Kinjo a National Living Treasure of Japan, and then he completed his M.A. at The Australian National University School of Art in 2005.

Julia Yonetani brings to their art her background also as a writer, and researcher, and she holds a PhD from the Australian National University. Julia has held positions lecturing and researching in History, Cultural Studies, and Art Theory at the University of New South Wales, Western Sydney University and the University of the Ryukyus, Japan.

A slide of Ken Yonetani's Geiger counter which he used while on a research trip around the top end of Australia with Julia Yonetani - the hand held device is capable of detecting ionizing radiation. Photo: Evelyn Tsitas

A slide of Ken Yonetani’s Geiger counter which he used while on a research trip around the top end of Australia with Julia Yonetani – the hand held device is capable of detecting ionizing radiation. Photo: Evelyn Tsitas

Perhaps in this powerful combination of an affinity and skill in research, writing, an eye to the marketplace and intense art training that the ability to convey complex ideas visually is manifested in their work. then again, perhaps it does the artists – any artists – a disservice to pry to hard into the Petri dish of inspiration and artistic imagination that conjures up art.

In a fascinating essay by Melanie Pollock their first book “Ken + Julia Yonetani” they explain “our motivation is not necessarily to motivate other people, but to express our own anxieties about the environment. We consider our works as a kind of healing process, which ultimately is very personal.”

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Slightly Radioactive: Ken + Julia Yonetani Artist Talk at RMIT Gallery Tuesday 26 May

Ken and Julia Yonetani are collaborative artists who work in the field of sculptural installation, video, and performance art. They will give an artist talk will speak at RMIT Gallery on Tuesday 26 May from 12.30 – 1.30 pm. Free – all welcome.

Ken and Julia’s stunning work in the RMIT Gallery exhibition Japanese Art After Fukushima (until 30 May) is only slightly radioactive – the glowing work explores the sense of fear they both had after the nuclear disaster in Fukushima in Japan when Ken was unable to contact his family and fearful they were at risk.

But out of the horror comes something beautiful – the two works currently on display at RMIT Gallery are from Crystal Palace: The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nuclear Nations (2013) a collection of 31 reconstructed chandeliers that represent the number of countries operating nuclear power plants around the globe.

The title of the work references the grandiose building designed for the Great Exhibition of 1851 in London, hinting at the tension between human ambition, technological development, and its costs and consequences. The Singapore Biennale 2013 marked the completion of this series and its world premiere showing in Southeast Asia, a region without nuclear power plants.

 

Thousands of glass beads containing uranium were used to construct the chandeliers, which were sourced throughout Europe, and which utilise Uranium glass, antique chandelier frames and electrical components and UV lights.

“It means they are only slightly radio active but the UV light reacts with the uranium in the glass to make that glowing color,” explains Julia.

The artists are interested in bringing environmental issues in their work. They were inspired to use chandeliers while in London when they noticed them in fashionable clothing shops. Intrigued, they looked into the history of chandeliers and discovered the connection to the beginning of consumerism and the advent of electricity.

“Uranium glass is the best way to show the fear of uranium glass because you can’t see uranium,” explains Ken.

Julia adds that the uranium glass that have used “is made from depleted uranium and is a by product of the uranium enrichment process – so its like recycling the byproduct of nuclear power.”

And only slightly radioactive. Don’t touch the artworks. Look in wonder only, and ponder the consequences of nuclear power – and our own lust for electricity in the first place. And ask yourself – would you go unplugged? And then ask – who is making the sacrifice for our energy? For our consumerism?

As Ken explained to Lisa Pollman in a wide ranging interview in artradarjournal.com; More nuclear power plants have been built after Fukushima and more wars have begun after World War II. I am not a pessimist, but I have to say that art cannot change the world. If [it were] so, it would have changed already. However, I could change my life through art. I changed my career from a financial broker to an artist. It depends on each person and how they want to change the world. That is why John Lennon and Yoko Ono said “War is Over! IF YOU WANT IT”.

Ken and Julia Yonetani artist talk at RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street Melbourne – Tuesday 26 May from 12.30 – 1.30 pm. Free – all welcome.

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Art After Fukushima: Ken and Julia Yonetani to speak at RMIT Gallery 26 May

Japanese Art After Fukushima: Return of Godzilla - RMIT Gallery 20 March- 30 May 2015. Installation image of work by Ken and Julia Yonetani by Mark Ashkanasy.

Installation image of work by Ken and Julia Yonetani by Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2015.

Artists Ken and Julia Yonetani’s eerie light display is part of the Japanese Art After Fukushima: Return of Godzilla (20 March – 30 May) exhibition at RMIT Gallery. The artists will be making a special visit from Japan to RMIT Gallery to talk about their work in the exhibition, which has captivated audiences.

Their stunning works use vintage uranium glass borosilicate tubing and emit a green, unnatural glow which is made by the uranium reacting to a UV bulb. 

RMIT Gallery 20 Mar 2015 - 30 May 2015 Japanese Art After Fukushima: Return of Godzilla

RMIT Gallery
20 Mar 2015 – 30 May 2015
Japanese Art After Fukushima: Return of Godzilla. Photo: Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2015

Renowned art critic Robert Nelson (The Age, SMH) wrote at length about the poetic qualities in the Yonetani’s work on May 19, and called the exhibition, curated by Linda Williams, “collected and thoughtful”, praising its relevance to the environmental themes presented in the thought provoking festival, Art + Climate = Change, which gathers local and international artists working with environmental ideas.

Ken + Julia Yonetani are an Australian / Japanese creative partnership whose work explores the interaction between humans, nature, science and the spiritual realm in the contemporary age.

Ken + Julia YONETANI Crystal Palace: The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nuclear Nations (Hungary), 2012  Antique chandelier frame, uranium, glass beads, wire, UV light bulbs and electric component 44 x 44 x 44 cm

Ken + Julia YONETANI
Crystal Palace: The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nuclear Nations (Hungary), 2012
Antique chandelier frame, uranium, glass beads, wire, UV light bulbs and electric component
44 x 44 x 44 cm. Photo Evelyn Tsitas

Conceived in response to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan in 2011, the work is comprised of 31 chandeliers. Antique chandelier frames have been refitted with uranium glass and UV lighting; once switched on, the UV bulbs cause the glass beads to glow with a haunting green. The pieces signal the 31 nuclear nations of the world, in the RMIT Gallery exhibition, Hungary and South Africa.

The size of each chandelier corresponds to the number of operating nuclear plants in each nation. The overarching title of the work references the grandiose building designed for the Great Exhibition of 1851 in London, hinting at the tension between human ambition, technological development and its costs and consequences.

Ken and Julia Yonetani will talk about the unusual materials they use in their works, such as uranium glass to provide thought-provoking contemporary installations.

Ken + Julia YONETANI Crystal Palace: The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nuclear Nations (Hungary), 2012  Antique chandelier frame, uranium, glass beads, wire, UV light bulbs and electric component 44 x 44 x 44 cm

Ken + Julia YONETANI
Crystal Palace: The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of all Nuclear Nations (Hungary), 2012
Antique chandelier frame, uranium, glass beads, wire, UV light bulbs and electric component
44 x 44 x 44 cm. Photo Evelyn Tsitas

As Ken Yonetani explained to artradarjournal.com (16/01/2015) about working with uranium glass (which is slightly radioactive) in the chandeliers – two of which are on display at RMIT Gallery; “Some specialists say it is safe for our health, but we wanted to work quickly to finish the installation…the number of chandeliers we had to do was 31 and it took two years. We are still alive!”

Japanese Art After Fukushima: Return of Godzilla is part of the Art + Climate = Change 2015 Festival presented by Climarte: Arts for a Safe Climate, celebrating and identifying Australian and international artists working with environmental ideas.

This exhibition focuses focus on the work of six contemporary Japanese and Japanese-Australian artists responding to the events at the Fukushima nuclear power plant in 2011 and its environmental implications; Yutaka Kobayashi; Ichi Ikeda; Manabu Ikeda; Takashi Kuribayashi; Finger Pointing Worker; and the collaboration of  Ken and Julia Yonetani.

What: Ken and Julia Yonetani – Artist floor talk

Date: Tuesday 26 May

Time: 12.30 – 1.30 pm

Venue: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street Melbourne

Bookings: Free. Bookings (03) 9925 1717

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Launch of the RMIT Art Collection Online

Accessing the RMIT Art Collection online. Picture: Vicki Jones Photography

You can now access the RMIT Art Collection online. Picture: Vicki Jones Photography

RMIT’s art collection has come out of the shadows, offices and walls around the university to reveal more than 1000 artworks in a searchable data base for students and researchers to explore.

The RMIT art collection online is a significant resource, facilitating wide general access to university’s  dispersed art collection. It provides an immersive experience combining both technology and education – and allows everyone, everywhere with access to technology to explore the treasures held – including fine art, photography, ceramics, sculpture, textiles, new media and a ground-breaking sonic arts collection.

For more than 125 years, the RMIT University art collection has served as both a repository for education and research, and as a source of inspiration.It provides a considerable overview of Australian art history and includes some of the most highly-regarded and successful artists that both the country and the University have produced. Works from the collection are regularly loaned for exhibition to other institutions, both within Australia and internationally.

Professionally cataloguing the entire collection has taken four intensive years, starting with partial paper records to a full accounting of all the fine art works that the university holds, in keeping with international best practice.

The online database has been meticulously annotated and researched, and provides a comprehensive global referencing system that is not only a natural progression for a university of technology, it will allow researchers access to information and history of individual artworks.

Work was undertaken by Jon Buckingham, RMIT Collections Coordinator, under the direction of Suzanne Davies, RMIT Gallery Director and Chair, RMIT University Art Collection Committee.

RMIT Collections Coordinator Jon Buckingham, responsible for putting the RMIT Art Collection online, speaks to MA students about how to use the resource to curate their own exhibitions. Photo Vicki Jones Photography

RMIT Collections Coordinator Jon Buckingham, responsible for putting the RMIT Art Collection online, speaks to MA students about how to use the resource to curate their own exhibitions. Photo Vicki Jones Photography

Mr Buckingham, who curated the 2014 exhibition Revelations: Sculpture from the RMIT Art Collection at RMIT Gallery, said that RMIT Art Collection builds on the history of RMIT, which is inextricably linked to the creative development of Melbourne.

“The range of work by artists considered masters of high abstraction, including members of the Centre Five Group, is well represented in the RMIT Art Collection and many of these sculptors such as Inge King and Vincas Jomantas were immigrants from post-war Europe who creatively influenced the development of modernism in Australia,” he said.

“The university has produced leading teachers such as George Baldessin, Inge King, Tate Adams, and significant Alumni Sam Leach, Lisa Roet, Vincent Fantauzzo, Robert Jacks, Clement Meadmore, Helen Brack, and Reko Rennie.”

MA Arts Management students at RMIT are already using the online collection to curate virtual exhibitions for their assignments. Photo Vicki Jones Photography

MA Arts Management students at RMIT are already using the online collection to curate virtual exhibitions for their assignments. Photo Vicki Jones Photography

Ms Davies said that the collection’s intuitive website had already been put to use as a teaching tool, with Master of Art students from the School of Art using it to curate a virtual exhibition for their final assessment in the Curating Contemporary Art program taught through RMIT Gallery.

Students are presented with real and hypothetical constraints for an exhibition proposal, and using the resources of the works in the RMIT Art Collection, will curate a virtual exhibition harnessing the information they have been provided with during the course, including budgeting, audience participation and reach, content, curatorial rationale, use of exhibition space, leverage of sponsors and knowledge of the Australian cultural events calendar.

“It is anticipated we will have a wide range of responses given that students now have access to a diverse range of catalogued items that provides a considerable overview of Australian and international art history,” she said.

“A commitment to quality and innovation in art practice is a primary focus for the RMIT University Art Collection. These works aspire to reflect and elaborate on the creative strengths of RMIT and its amazing story,” Ms Davies said.

The RMIT Art Collection online serves as a global teaching and research resource. Picture Vicki Jones Photography

The RMIT Art Collection online serves as a global teaching and research resource. Picture Vicki Jones Photography

“RMIT University has remarkable and esoteric collections of objects in the areas of Design and Fine Art Practices.

“Bringing the RMIT Art Collection online showcases the university’s strengths in the design and fine art sphere, and illustrates how these areas are in dialogue with each other. It also highlights RMIT’s commitment to both Australia’s cultural history, and its future.”

Click here to access the RMIT Art Collection Online

Who Speaks for the Earth?: Energy, Politics and Art Forum at Deakin Edge, Federation Square on 7 May


Thursday 7 May, 6:00 PM:  Who Speaks for the Earth?:  Energy, Politics and Art. Bookings and information.climarte-910x450_0

Japanese Art After Fukushima: Return of Godzilla - RMIT Gallery 20 March- 30 May 2015. Installation image of work by Ken and Julia Yonetani by Mark Ashkanasy.

Japanese Art After Fukushima: Return of Godzilla – RMIT Gallery 20 March- 30 May 2015. Installation image of work by Ken and Julia Yonetani by Mark Ashkanasy.

A public forum about how climate change and environmental risks are represented from different positions in the arts, politics and in debates on nuclear energy. Follow the discussion throughout the night: #earthspeaks2015

An RMIT Gallery and ART + CLIMATE = CHANGE 2015 Festival event presented by CLIMARTE, in conjunction with the AEGIS Research Network. AEGIS is a network of artists and scholars focused on the question of how the arts and humanities can respond to natural history and the global problems of climate change and loss of biodiversity.

Kindly supported by Melbourne Conversations, the City of Melbourne’s program of free talks.

Speakers:

Chair: Associate Professor Linda Williams, RMIT University (curator of the exhibition Japanese Art After Fukushima: Return of Godzilla at RMIT Gallery 20 March – 30 May).

Dr Helen Caldicott (Author and environmental activist) will speak on how conflicting interests are represented in public debates on nuclear power.

William L. Fox (Author, Nevada Center for Art + Environment) will talk about the age of the Anthropocene and its cultural representation.

Associate Professor Peter Christoff (University of Melbourne) is a political scientist, teaching and researching climate policy and environmental policy. He will speak on how the issue of climate change is addressed in politics.

Professor Kate Rigby (Monash University) will focus on how writers and philosophers are responding to the issue.

David Buckland (Cape Farewell) will speak about how the Cape Farewell Project has enabled artists and people from other fields to interpret climate change.

 Event sponsored by:

Melbourne Conversations, the City Of Melbourne’s Program of free talks
Japanese Art After Fukushima: Return of Godzilla, RMIT Gallery 20 Mar 2015 - 30 May 2015. Image - Mark Ashkanasy

Japanese Art After Fukushima: Return of Godzilla, RMIT Gallery
20 Mar 2015 – 30 May 2015. Image – Mark Ashkanasy

ELISION Ensemble enthrals audience with world-line cycle

Peter Neville, percussion, ELISION Ensemble

Peter Neville, percussion, ELISION Ensemble. Photo: Vicki Jones Photography.

The ELISION Ensemble performance at RMIT Storey Hall on 30 April was totally, viscerally enthralling. And the musicianship superb!! The Australian premiere of Richard Barrett’s world-line cycle and the energetic, kinetic performance enthralled a full house at RMIT Storey Hall. We are still on a high. 

Tristram Williams, trumpet, ELISION Ensemble

Tristram Williams, trumpet, ELISION Ensemble. Photo: Vicki Jones Photography.

ELISION, Australia’s International Contemporary Music Ensemble are Daryl Buckley, electric lap steel guitar; Tristram Williams, trumpet; Peter Neville, percussion.

The three movements of Richard Barrett’s world lines were commissioned for the RMIT Sonic Arts collection. ‘World-line’ is a term derived from the theory of relativity, and denotes the history of a particle or object as it passes through the dimensions of time and space.

As we were recording the performances for the RMIT Art Collection, the doors were shut during the performance and the audience was respectful of the event – not one cough, not one shuffle, not one mobile phone beep. Perfection!

Daryl Buckley, electric lap steel guitar, ELISION Ensemble

Daryl Buckley, electric lap steel guitar, ELISION Ensemble. Photo: Vicki Jones Photography.

Audiences also heard Timothy McCormack’s Heavy Matter, featuring Ben Marks, on solo trombone, and Liza Lim’s Weaver of Fictions featuring Genevieve Lacey, on solo Ganassi recorder. What pleasure in hearing – and watching – these consummate performances. Ben Marks, on trombone, performing Timothy McCormack’s Heavy Matter. Photo: Vicki Jones Photography.

Ben Marks, on trombone, performing Timothy McCormack’s Heavy Matter. Photo: Vicki Jones Photography.

Genevieve Lacey, on solo Ganassi recorder, performing 2.Liza Lim’s Weaver of Fictions. Photo: Vicki Jones Photography.

Genevieve Lacey, on solo Ganassi recorder, performing 2. Liza Lim’s Weaver of Fictions. Photo: Vicki Jones Photography.