Season’s Greetings From The Team At RMIT Gallery

RMITGallery2014SeasonsGreetings

 

SD xmas Korean dinner IMG_3562

Christmas Networking Dinner With The Korean Consulate 

RMIT Gallery exhibits a wide range of international and Australian artists and exhibitions, and RMIT Gallery Director and Chief Curator Suzanne Davies (front row left, in white) maintains strong links with Australia’s diverse cultural communities.

Ms Davies met with Consul-General of the Republic of Korea Jung Sung-sub (pictured next to her in the picture, front centre) at a Christmas networking dinner dinner for the arts community in Melbourne. “He is a most gracious host,” she said.

The Consulate-General of the Republic of Korea in Melbourne has jurisdiction over the State of Victoria. The Consulate-General was officially launched on December 17, 2012, to meet the growing importance of political, economic, cultural, and educational ties between Korea and Victoria and the high demand for consular services, including passport and visa services, and the protection of the safety of Koreans in Victoria.

 

After the Big Bang – Korinsky’s sound installation in Experimenta Recharge

 

Abel Korinsky with his work Korinsky Collective: RL2000 2014 sound and mixed media installation dimensions variable. Photo Evelyn Tsitas, RMIT Gallery, 2014

Abel Korinsky with his work  RL2000 2014
sound and mixed media installation
dimensions variable. Photo Evelyn Tsitas, RMIT Gallery, 2014

We are all fascinated by artistic practice and the ‘working out’ of process that offers us a ‘behind the scenes’ glimpse of how creative work is developed. But what of the finished product?

German sound artist Abel Korinsky, who is in Melbourne on a two month residency with Experimenta and RMIT, gave audiences an insight into his process when he joined theoretical astrophysicist Dr Katie Mack and RMIT’s Lawrence Harvey, Associate Professor and Director of SIAL Sound Studios, on 29 October, 2014 at RMIT Gallery to talk about space – art – and Big Bang Sounds.

Missed the talk? Catch up with the podcast and blog – click here.

You can now see Abel Korinsky’s finished artwork using the ideas of the resonance of Big Bang sounds as inspiration for RL2000, by visiting the exhibition Experimenta Recharge: 6th International Biennial of Media Art at RMIT Gallery until 21 February.

Korinsky’s artwork RL2000 2014,sound and mixed media installation, picks up on the ideas he discussed in the Melbourne Knowledge Week talk available on podcast, and asks audiences to imagine that sound never fully disappears and is present in our universe forever. What would it sound like to hear all the sounds of the past and present? How would it change our perceptions of time and death?

Korinsky Collective: RL2000 2014 sound and mixed media installation dimenions variable. Photo Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2014

Korinsky Collective: RL2000 2014
sound and mixed media installation
dimensions variable. Photo Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2014

As part of the sound artist collective Korinsky (together with his twin brother Carlo, and younger brother Max) Abel presents the sound piece in an immersive installation inspired by the recent announcement by researchers at the Harvard-Smithsonian Centre that they had documented sound waves from the Big Bang soon after the birth of our universe. In a room in RMIT Gallery where the work is exhibited, when the lights go off intermittently the audience is plunged into darkness which quickly fills with fluorescent glow of paint on the spider-like central pod that is reminiscent perhaps of a 1950s Sci Fi movie set design. 

Korinsky Collective: RL2000 2014 sound and mixed media installation dimenions variable. Photo Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2014

Korinsky Collective: RL2000 2014
sound and mixed media installation
dimensions variable. Photo Mark Ashkanasy, RMIT Gallery, 2014

The artists invite audiences to imagine the implications of hearing sounds from the past and to place themselves in a situation where perceptions of time, space and place might be disrupted.

Korinsky’s work has been developed during a residency with Experimenta as part of the EMARE AUS
CDN Move On Exchange (European media artists in residence in exchange with Australia and
Canada). This program is supported by the Culture 2013 Programme of the European Commission.

Come and play at Experimenta Recharge: now open at RMIT Gallery

Paranoia, 2010, reactive sculpture 15 x 11 x 20 cm by Anaisa Franco. Photo by Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

Paranoia, 2010,
reactive sculpture
15 x 11 x 20 cm by Anaisa Franco. Photo by Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

Today at RMIT Gallery something has been screaming non stop – it’s Anaisa Franco reactive sculpture “Paranoia” and the Experimenta Recharge audience are delighting in standing close and watching (and hearing) those false teeth scream!

The screaming (and laughing) teeth are part of the Brazilian artist’s Psychosomatic series: Paranoia (2010), Frustration (2012), and Emanating Happiness (2014); reactive sculptures that create an endless loop of emotional responses between her artworks and audience.

Inspired by psychology, dreams and the possibilities inherent in DIY electrical engineering, Anaisa animates objects with behaviours and feelings to blur the boundaries between body, mind and machine. Each electronic sculpture embodies a particular emotion and highlights the potential of the digital to reconnect us with latent human emotions and the potential uses of digital interfaces.

‘Paranoia’ is one of three of Anaisa’s artworks on display at the 6th International Biennial of Media Art at RMIT Gallery until 21 February 2015…and yes, it screams.

Artist Ei Wada plays with Anaisa Franco's sensitive sculpture  'Frustration' at Experimenta Recharge.

Artist Ei Wada plays with Anaisa Franco’s sensitive sculpture ‘Frustration’ at Experimenta Recharge. Photo by Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

A little more quiet is Frustration 2012, a sensitive sculpture. Anaisa, who was born in Sao Paulo, Brazil and lives Berlin, Germany, works with robotics and low-fi electronics to produce interactive sculptures and installation that connect mechanical processes with the subconscious human mind. At the Experimenta Recharge opening weekend arts seminar, Anaisa talked about the role of the body as a holder of knowledge and memory in her work. With a mother who is a psychologist, Anaisa said she naturally gravitated to the ideas arising from psychology for inspiration in her artwork.

Anaisa Franco's Emanating Happiness 2014, interactive sculpture, wood, LED neon flex. Image: Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

Anaisa Franco’s Emanating Happiness 2014, interactive sculpture, wood, LED neon flex. Image: Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

Anaisa’s work Emanating Happiness, 2014 is an interactive sculpture that generates an exuberant and colorful light wave when people walk on it. The work is part of Psychosomatic Series.

It has been developed during an artist in residence program at Creative and Cognition Studios, University of Technology, Sydney, November, 2014, as part of the EMARE AUS CDN Move On Exchange (European media artists in residence in exchange with Australia and Canada). This program is supported by the Culture 2013 Programme of the European Commission and the Goethe Institute.

Anaisa has a Master in Digital Art and Technology at University of Plymouth in England and graduated in Visual Arts at FAAP in Sao Paulo. She has been exhibiting internationally around the world.

Anaisa Franco's Emanating Happiness 2014, interactive sculpture, wood, LED neon flex. Image: Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

Anaisa Franco’s Emanating Happiness 2014, interactive sculpture, wood, LED neon flex. Image: Vicki Jones Photography, RMIT Gallery, 2014.

A decade ago, Anaisa revealed to an art magazine her dream of one day creating a biological
species of robots. “The central idea would be to produce beings that were self-programmed, self-developed, self-reproducing, beings that lack patterns and rules to control them. I would…build an alive house, where all inanimate things would be alive and genetically modified. In this new world new forms of life could evolve.” With her interactive sculptures at Experimenta Recharge, it is possible to see how the artist has pursued an aspect of that dream.

Exhibition: Experimenta Recharge: 6th International Biennial of Media Art

Artist: Anaisa Franco

Works: Psychosomatic series: Paranoia (2010), Frustration (2012), and Emanating Happiness (2014)

Venue: RMIT Gallery, 344 Swanston Street, Melbourne.

Dates: Now showing until 21 February 2015