Sounds Like Deep Space – Big Bang Sounds podcast is live

Sounds Like Deep Space...(left to right) Dr Katie Mack, Abel Korinsky and Lawrence Harvey

(left to right) Dr Katie Mack, Abel Korinsky and Lawrence Harvey

Time, space, distance – who isn’t fascinated by what’s up in the stars and beyond?  Artists have been gazing to the heavens since they picked up something to draw with and record what they saw with their eyes and imaginations. So it is no surprise then that in 2014, an experimental artist has turned to the cosmos for inspiration.

Working with multichannel sound installations, artist German artist Abel Korinsky questions what could happen if sounds from the past could be reconstructed and heard. What would the Big Bang sound like? A new work by Korinsky is included in the upcoming Experimenta Recharge 6th International Biennial of Media Art exhibition held at RMIT Gallery from 28 November 2014 to 21 February 2015.

As a preview of things to come, he joined theoretical astrophysicist Dr Katie Mack and RMIT’s Lawrence Harvey, Associate Professor and Director of SIAL Sound Studios, on 29 October, 2014 at RMIT Gallery to talk about space – art – and Big Bang Sounds.

Missed it? Listen to the podcast here:

As Lawrence Harvey pondered, why does the notion of the Big Bang hold such a fascination for people? It was a full house for the talk, with artists, scientists, and those simply fascinated by the concepts listening to the trio talk. Dr Sarah Jane Pell, an artist exploring the Aesthetics & Technics of Human Performance Exploration, grabbed a front row seat and questioned Abel Korinsky about placing himself in unusual environments to create his work and find inspiration for sound art and performance.

Artist Sarah Jane Pell and Abel Korinsky
Artist Sarah Jane Pell and Abel Korinsky

IMG_5601The audience sat enthralled, surrounded for the talk by the spectacular artwork from Balgo in the exhibition Warlayirti: The Art of Balgo. The exhibition has now come down to make way for Experimenta Recharge, which opens on 28 November – but Warlayirti: The Art of Balgo can be seen in the NT, at the Araluen Arts Centre (28 November – 15 February 2015).

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IMG_5597Katie Mack (@AstroKatie) suggested people are fascinated by space – and the Big Bang – because everyone wants to know where we came from and has a curiosity about the beginning and the end and what it would have been like at the beginning of time. Dr Mack is a theoretical astrophysicist. Throughout her career as a researcher at Caltech, Princeton, Cambridge, and now Melbourne University, she has studied dark matter, black holes, cosmic strings, and the formation of the first galaxies in the Universe.

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“I can think of time as distance – the concept of now is tricky. I can’t observe now anywhere else – if you are moving quickly time passes differently. Time and space are linked together.

“Time passes and things end but everything follows on from everything else. If we were on a planet 65 million light years ago and we had a powerful enough telescope we could see the dinosaurs on earth.”

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Interestingly, Kate spoke about how she uses art when thinking about time and space, referencing works such as Salvador Dalí’s The Persistence of Memory. The works from Balgo were another example of how the resonance of sound and ideas of time and space might be imagined, she said.

Warlayirti: The Art of Balgo  at RMIT Gallery, 16 September – Saturday 8 November, 2014. Photo: Mark Ashkanasy, 2014.
Warlayirti: The Art of Balgo at RMIT Gallery, 16 September – Saturday 8 November, 2014. Photo: Mark Ashkanasy, 2014.

The audience then heard a snippet of Abel Korinsky’s big bang sounds…..

The Big Bang Sounds talk release on podcast is timely indeed with the successful landing of a robotic spacecraft on a comet for the first time in history. Rosetta mission’s safe landing on gives scientists their first chance to ride a comet and study close up what happens as it gets closer to the sun.

Both scientists and artists reach for the stars when they launch ambitious projects. Their ambitions and fearlessness are about the challenge of being bold and not being afraid. The success of the Big Bang Sounds talk is a small step in this direction – the Rosetta Mission a cosmic and large one – and ventures are mirrored in the bold, ambitious new media works that will be on show at the  Experimenta Recharge 6th International Biennial of Media Art exhibition held at RMIT Gallery from 28 November 2014 to 21 February 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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